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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
DIMEV 630
IMEV 373
NIMEV 373
As I walked upon a day / To take the air of field & flower
Give me License to live in Ease — eleven 12-line stanzas with refrain phrase ‘to lyue in ease.’
Note: Ringler Jr. (1992).
Subjects: contemporary conditions; sins, deadly; chansons d’aventure
Versification: — twelve-line — ababababbcbc



Manuscript Witnesses:
1.Source: Cambridge UK, Cambridge University Library Ff.1.6 [Findern MS], ff. 56v-58v
First Lines:
As I walkyd a pon a day
To take the eyre of fylde & floure
Apon a mylde mornyng of may
When floures ben full of swete savoure…
Last Lines:
…In that worthy blys that we may dwell
And gyff vs all lysens to lyve in ease
Attributed Author: quod lewestone (f. 58v)
Attributed Title: Explicit in veritate Da michi quod merui (f. 58v)
Facsimiles:
Beadle, Richard, and Alfred E. B. Owen. The Findern Manuscript: Cambridge University Library MS. F.1.6. London: Scolar Press, 1977.
Editions:
Halliwell-Phillipps, James Orchard. Nugae Poeticae: Select Pieces of Old English Popular Poetry, Illustrating the Manners and Arts of the Fifteenth Century. London: J. R. Smith, 1844: 64-7.
Furnivall, Frederick James, ed. Political, Religious and Love Poems, from Lambeth MS. 306 and other sources. EETS o.s. 15 (1866); repr. 1962; rev. ed. 1903: 244-8.
2.Source: London, British Library Sloane 747, ff. 95-96
3.Source: San Marino, CA, Henry Huntington Library HM 183 [olim Hawkins], f. 5ra-5rb
First Lines:
As I walkyd vppon a day
To take þe aere off feld and flowre…
Last Lines:
…And withyn his gloryus blysse thatt we all may dwell
And geve vs there licence to lyve yn ese
Note: Written as prose; nineteenth-century transcript by Haslewood in London, British Library Addit. 11307, f. 121.
Editions:
Brydges, Sir Samuel Egerton. Censura Literaria. 10 vols. London: Longman, 1805-09; 2nd ed., 1815: 8.77-81.
Brown, Carleton Fairchild, ed. Religious Lyrics of the XVth Century. Oxford: Clarendon, 1939: 273-7.