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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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DIMEV 5581
IMEV 3535
NIMEV see 3327/Selections I
There is no more dreadful pestilence
‘The Tongue’, a composite poem incorporating three stanzas from Lydgate’s Fall of Princes (1904), I.4621-41, and three stanzas from Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseide (5248), III.302-22 — seven stanzas rhyme royal.
Author(s): Geoffrey Chaucer; John Lydgate
Title(s): ‘The Tongue’
Subjects: tongue, destructive power of; composite poems
Versification: — seven-line — ababbcc



Manuscript Witnesses:
1.Source: Cambridge UK, Cambridge University Library Ff.1.6 [Findern MS], ff. 150-151
First Lines:
Ther is nomore dredfull pestelens
Than is tonge that can flatere & fage
ffor with his corsyd crabbed violens
He enfecteth folkes of euerey Age…
Last Lines:
…As he that is boonde and wol not be free
Ryght so farithe hit now by me
Facsimiles:
Beadle, Richard, and Alfred E. B. Owen. The Findern Manuscript: Cambridge University Library MS. F.1.6. London: Scolar Press, 1977.
Editions:
Furnivall, Frederick James, ed. Odd Texts of the Minor Poems. 2 vols. Chaucer Society 1st ser. 23, 60. London: Trübner, 1868, 1880; repr. New York and London: Johnson, 1967: App., xi.