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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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DIMEV 4601
IMEV 2903
NIMEV 2903
Saint George our Lady knight
A charm against nightmare — nine lines
Subjects: charms; George, saint
Versification: — two-line, three-line — aa, aaa



Manuscript Witnesses:
1.Source: Oxford, Bodleian Library Rawlinson C.506 (SC 15353), ff. 297-297v
First Lines:
Seynt iorge our lady knyȝth
He walked day he walked noyȝth
Till þat he fownde þat fowle wyȝth
& whan þat he her fownde…
Note: Preceded by prose instructions for charm: ‘ffor the Nyȝthe mare: Take a flynt stone þat hath an hole thorow of hys awen growyng & hange it ouer þe stabill dor or ell ouer horse and eft writhe þis charme In nomine patris & cetera’; written as prose.
Editions:
Robbins, Rossell Hope, ed. Secular Lyrics of the XIV and XV Centuries. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon, 1955: 61.
Sisam, Celia, and Kenneth Sisam, eds. The Oxford Book of Medieval English Verse. Oxford: Clarendon, 1970: 384.
Luria, Maxwell Sidney, and Richard L. Hoffman, eds. Middle English Lyrics. New York: Norton, 1974: 113.



Print Witnesses:
1.Source: STC 3152. Blundeville, Thomas, The fower chiefyst offices belongyng to horsemanshippe that is to saye. The office of the breeder, of the rider, of the keper, and of the ferrer. In the firste parte wherof is declared the order of breding of horses. In the seconde howe to breake them, and to make theym horses of seruyce, conteyninge the whole art of ridynge lately set forth, and nowe newly corrected and amended of manye faultes escaped in the fyrste printynge, as well touchyng the bittes as other wyse. Thirdely howe to dyet them, aswell when they reste as when they trauell by the way. Fourthly to what diseases they be subiecte, together with the causes of such diseases, the sygnes howe to knowe them, and finally howe to cure the same. Whyche bookes are not onely paynfully collected out of a nomber of aucthours, but also orderly dysposed and applyed to the vse of thys oure cou[n]trey. By Tho. Blundeuill of Newton Flotman in Norff., Imprinted at London: By VVyllyam Seres dwellyng at the west ende of Paules churche, at the signe of the Hedgehogge. Cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum, [1566] , f. 17v
2.Source: STC 3153. Blundeville, Thomas, The fower chiefest offices belonging to horsemanshippe that is to say, the office of the breeder, of the rider, of the keeper, and of the ferrer. In the first parte wherof is declared the order of breeding of horses. In the seconde howe to breake them, and to make them horses of seruice. Conteyninge the whole art of ryding latelye set foorth, and nowe newelye corrected and amended of manye faultes escaped in the fyrst printing, as well touchyng the byttes as otherwyse. Thirdely, howe to dyet them, aswell when they reste as when they traueyle by the way. Fourthly, to what diseases they be subiecte togither with the causes of such diseases, the sygnes howe to knowe them, and finally howe to cure the same. which bookes are not onely painefully collected out of a number of aucthours, but also orderly dysposed and applyed to the vse of thys oure countrey. By Tho. Blundeuill of Newton Flotman in Norff., Imprinted at London: By VVillyam Seres dwellyng at the west ende of Paules church, at the sygne of the Hedgehogge. Cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum, [ca. 1570]
Note: Further printed editions reprinting Blundeville are STC 3154-3157.
Editions:
B., E. “An Old Charm.” Notes and Queries 6th series 1 (1880): 54: 54.
Kittredge, George Lyman. Witchcraft in Old and New England. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1929: 220.
Greene, Richard Leighton, ed. A Selection of English Carols. Clarendon Medieval and Tudor Series. Oxford: Clarendon, 1962: 228.