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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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DIMEV 3900
IMEV 2436
NIMEV 2436
O Fortune dost thou my death conspire
Complaint on Fortune, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 93) — three 10-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Author(s): Charles d’Orléans
Subjects: Fortune, complaint against; complaints, lovers’; envoys
Versification: — ten-line, four-line — ababbaacac, abab



Manuscript Witnesses:
1.Source: London, British Library Harley 682, ff. 27v-28
First Lines:
O Fortune dost thou my deth conspyre
Onys let me pese y pray thee hertily…
Last Lines:
…Martir am y for loue and prisonere
Allas allas and is this not ynow
Editions:
Taylor, G. Watson. Poems Written in English by Charles Duke of OrleansOrleans, during his Captivity in England after the Battle of Azincourt Roxburghe Club 44. London, 1827: 62-3.
Hammond, Eleanor Prescott. English Verse between Chaucer and Surrey. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1927: 224-5.
Steele, Robert, ed. Charles of Orleans: The English Poems. Vol. 1. EETS o.s. 215 (1941); vol. 2. ed. Robert Steele and Mabel Day, o.s. 220; repr. as one volume, 1970: 48-9.
“Poems, written in English, by Charles Duke of Orleans, during his Captivity in England, after the Battle of Agincourt.” Gentleman’s Magazine n.s. 17 (May, 1842): 459-72: 462 (extracts).
Arn, Mary-Jo, ed. Fortunes Stabilnes: Charles of Orleans’s English Book of Love. A Critical Edition. Binghamton, NY: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1994: 187-8.