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The DIMEV: An Open-Access, Digital Edition of the Index of Middle English Verse

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We would like to thank research assistants who worked on this project in the 1990s and whose contributions were invaluable to getting this project started.

In 1994-5, Thierry Petersen, then an undergraduate at the University of Maine, assisted by scanning the Index of Middle English Verse, proofreading and correcting the scanned text so that it could form the basis for a word processing document for compiling the DIMEV.

In 1995-7, Dr. Malcolm Burson assisted by collecting extensive further bibliographic information, bringing the bibliography up to date, and identifying new pieces of Middle English verse to add to the data base.

In 1998-9, Isaac Kimball, also then an undergraduate at the University of Maine, assisted by conducting extensive bibliographical research in the National Union Catalogue and on-line catalogues to complete many of the brief and often inaccurate bibliographic references from the original Index and its Supplement.

In 2008-9, Dr. Chloe Morgan assisted us with the bibliography, bringing it up to date for editions published between 2000 and 2008, funded by a small grant from the Department of English and Related Literature, University of York.

We would also like to thank Prof. Mary Hamel of Mount St Mary’s College for collecting data for the DIMEV from manuscripts in the Lambeth Palace Library.

Working half-time under the auspices of a Modern Humanities Research Association (UK) grant, Deborah Thorpe transcribed records from 336 manuscripts at the British Library between October 2012 and September 2013.

Prof. Michael Johnston (Purdue University) continues to be an invaluable resource, alerting us to needed corrections and providing missing transcriptions on a regular basis.

The Inter-Library Loan service at Virginia Tech’s Newman Library has indefatigably provided copies of obscure and hard-to-find references.

We also thank Virginia Tech’s Center for Applied Technologies in the Humanities (CATH) and the Center for Digital Discourse in the Humanities (CDDC) for hosting the DIMEV project).