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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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Found Records:
Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates’ 18.7.21
Linguistic note: McIntosh, Samuels, and Benskin (1986) and Benskin, Laing, Karaiskos, and Williamson (2013) LP 4041; Grid 568 290 (Norfolk).
Number 6715-1
1.      With a sorrow and a clout
One couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6165-1
2.      We been healed that were sick
Christ’s saving work — one couplet translating ‘Sanati sumus’ (Is. 53.5) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 2313-1
3.   f. 1rb   I will…
A fragment — eight lines, possibly in couplets
Number 1399-1
4.   f. 1rb   For thing that is to asken
Instructions in prayer — seven lines, probably monorime, possibly a translation of the Latin Pro debita circum… which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 5124-1
5.   f. 2rb   Tell not thy friend all that thou wost
Warning against telling all one knows, in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
— a single stanza of eight lines
Number 722-1
6.   ff. 2v-3   At the time of matins Lord Thou were I-take
The Hours of the Cross — couplets arranged in one 6-line stanza and seven quatrains
Number 606-4
7.   ff. 3v-4v   As I lay upon a night
A Dialogue between the Virgin Mary and her Infant — thirty-seven quatrains (abab) with refrain ‘Alone in my longyng’ and two-line burden: ‘Lullay lullay la lullay / My dere moder lullay’
Number 2480-1
8.   ff. 4vb-5va   In Bethlehem a child is I-born
A song of the Nativity, Star, Magi, etc., and reference to the Passion — twenty quatrains (abab) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 607-2
9.   f. 5va-5vb   As I lay upon a night
A song of the Virgin Mary and Joseph — sixteen quatrains (a virelai)
Number 5669-1
10.   f. 6   This child then worship we
Bidding to worship the child Jesus — one cross-rhymed quatrain
Number 3301-2
11.   f. 6   Lullay lullay little child
Christ weeps in the cradle for man’s sin — seven quatrains (aaab) and burden: ‘Lullay lullay litel child / qwi wepest þou so sore’
Number 3771-1
12.   f. 10   Now is up now is down
On Mutability — four lines, abcb; or 6 lines, abcddc; or two long lines, in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6234-1
13.   f. 10v   What is more dread
Poverty and Penance — two 6-line stanzas (aabccb) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5550-1
14.   f. 12   Then is abstinence of worthiness
A couplet translating ‘Tunc est preclara apud Deum abstinencia cum animus ieiunat a viciis’ in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5527-1
15.   f. 12   The wise heart and understanding
Paraphrase of Ecclesiasticus iii. 32, in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook — a couplet
Number 387-1
16.   f. 12   All the words that drawen to sin / Think that venom is therein
A couplet translating ‘Omne seminarium voluptatis venenum puta’ in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 5624-1
17.   f. 13   They been not well for to leven
On the pitfalls of praise — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook translating ‘Non bene creduntur si multa loquatur…’ or ‘Non bene creduntur nimium qui blanda locuntur…’ which precedes it
Number 3056-1
18.   f. 13   Let leave him that mickle speaketh
On speaking truth — one couplet translating ‘Rara credatur cuiquam si multa loquatur’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2410-1
19.   f. 13   If thou wilt been rich or cleped holy
On flattery — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook translating ‘Si vis ditari vel ut propheta vocari…’, which follows it
Number 4357-1
20.   f. 14   Pecunia maketh wrong right
On the power of money, in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook — two couplets
Number 6790-1
21.   f. 15   Worlds bliss maketh me blind
On greed — four couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5499-1
22.   f. 15   The thing that thou might leesen clepeth not thine own
Four lines translating: ‘Nil tuum dixeris quod potes perderis’, etc. in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5994-1
23.   f. 16   To playen and ragen is for thy prow
Consilium Diaboli’ — three couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5466-1
24.   f. 16   The slow man is but a dry tree that no fruit will bearen
A triplet on the slothful man in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2404-1
25.   f. 16   If thou givest him eaten enough then must him sleepen
On the slothful man — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2234-1
26.   f. 17v   I ne wot what is love
Nescio quid sit amor — two quatrains (abab) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook translating four Latin lines
Number 4276-1
27.   f. 18v   On the tree he has I-born
Christ died for our sins — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3281-1
28.   f. 19   Love made Christ in our lady to light
On the Love of Christ — four rhyming lines (aa) appearing twice in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3181-1
29.   f. 19   Look that thou for no friend be
Love one another — one couplet translating ‘Noli esse pro amoico inimicus proximo tuo’ (Ecclesiasticus 6.1) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1459-1
30.   f. 19   Friendship is felony
Four of the ‘Twelve Abuses of the Age’ — four monoriming lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 1878-1
31.   f. 19v   He that loveth his friend and foe
On Christian love — one couplet translating ‘Dileccio proximi malum non operatur’ (Rom. 13.10) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3273-1
32.   f. 20   Love is bliss in mans mind
On Christian Love — four couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3181-2
33.   f. 21   Look that thou for no friend be
Love one another — one couplet translating ‘Noli esse pro amoico inimicus proximo tuo’ (Ecclesiasticus 6.1) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1436.1-1
34.   f. 21   If Thou wilt do Gods lore
On returning evil for evil — one couplet written to the right of, and commenting on, ‘Nulli malum pro malo reddentes’ (Rom. 12.17) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1730-1
35.   f. 23v   Hail Mary and well Thou be
A hymn on the Angelic Salutation — ten lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1037-1
36.   f. 23v   Clearness of understanding
The soul of the Christian likened to gold — seven monorhyming lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notes following ‘Sic in anima debet esse
Number 6669-1
37.   f. 24   Why have thee no ruth on my child
The Appeal of the Virgin Mary to the Jews — two quatrains in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 1848-1
38.   f. 24v   He that all thing doth well
A tag, translating ‘Tota die laudat qui omnia bene agit’, here attributed to Augustine — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 870-1
39.   f. 24v   Blessed mote tho paps be
Blessings on the Virgin Mary for suckling Christ — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notes following ‘Benedicta sint vbera que lactauerunt Christum
Number 4386-1
40.   f. 25   Poor and hungry that han need
Verses on who shall have the bliss of Heaven — two couplets translating ‘Pauper et esuriens mitis mundus miseratus’ (Matt. 5.3-10), which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 858-1
41.   f. 25   Blessed been men poor with will
The Beatitudes — seven couplets, each accompanied with the corresponding Latin tag from Matt. 5:3-10
Number 3510-2
42.   f. 25v   Mine hearts joy is went away
Two couplets, translating Lamentations 5:15-16
Number 4851-1
43.   ff. 28-28v   Sinful man ne dread thee not
On involuntary sinful thoughts — five couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5832-1
44.   f. 29   Thou man that wilt knowen thyself look what thou hast thought
How to know thyself, paraphrasing the formula Nosce teipsum — three monorhyming lines
Number 6645-1
45.   f. 32v   Whoso will in soul have bliss
On worldly goods — two couplets translating ‘Absit ditari qui se wult mente beari.…’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6035-1
46.   f. 32v   To waxen rich with great blame
On the Avaricious Man — one couplet translating ‘Ditari nitor non curo quomodo ditor’ in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 3689-2
47.   f. 32v   Never to yielden and ever to craven
Aphorism in John of Grimestone’s sermon book — one couplet
Number 1838-1
48.   f. 32v   He maketh himself great in richesse
A couplet translating ‘Hic bene se ditat qui semper inania uitat
Number 35-1
49.   f. 32v   A false beginning
Cupiditas est — three lines
Number 970-1
50.   f. 33v   Charity is bright of word
The Sixteen Points of Charity — eight couplets paraphrasing I Cor.13:4-8 in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 1847-1
51.   f. 35   He taketh other colours aright
On God’s gift of light and colour — one monorhyming quatrain in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5144-1
52.   f. 37   That I wretch that sinful was
The vow of the penitent and the confessor’s reply — three couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 977-1
53.   f. 38v   Children been little bright and sheen and eath for to fillen
Characteristics of children — one couplet translating ‘Sicut pueri parui, puri, paruo saciati / Ludunt conformes, cito dant, cito pacificantur’, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 6887-1
54.   f. 40v   Youth ne can not but leaden me will
Youth and Age — three couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2428-1
55.   f. 40v   If ye liven after the fleshes rede
The fruits of carnal sin — one couplet translating ‘Si secundum carnem vixeritis moriemini’ (Rom. 8.13) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6-1
56.   f. 40v   A barge to bearen fro deep grounds
Crux est’ — four lines
Number 2882-1
57.   f. 42   Jesu my sweet which that all thing has wrought
A prayer for purity of thought — one monorhyming 4-line stanza in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 5710-1
58.   f. 43   This is my body as ye may see
Christ’s words of institution — one couplet after the heading ‘Hoc est corpus meum’ in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 2756-1
59.   f. 43   It strengtheth man in his fighting
The benefits of Corpus Christi — two quatrains in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1874-1
60.   f. 43   He that is king of all lands
Corpus Christi’ — one quatrain (abab) translating ‘Rex sedet in mensa turba cinctus duodena’ which is written to its left in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 248-1
61.   f. 45v   Against my fellows that I have spoken
A speaker bewails that backbiting has lended him in hell — one quatrain following the Latin, Lingua calet igne, iam inheret mosibus ori
Number 3407-1
62.   f. 46v   Many years been I-went / sithen truth out of land is lent
Against flatterers, paraphrasing Latin verses: Multis annis iam transactis nulla fides in pactis — one quatrain to the right in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6783-1
63.   f. 46v   Words been so knit with sin
Sin and speech go together — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5624-2
64.   f. 46v   They been not well for to leven
On the pitfalls of praise — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook translating ‘Non bene creduntur si multa loquatur…’ or ‘Non bene creduntur nimium qui blanda locuntur…’ which precedes it
Number 3056-2
65.   f. 46v   Let leave him that mickle speaketh
On speaking truth — one couplet translating ‘Rara credatur cuiquam si multa loquatur’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1878
66.   f. 47   He that loveth his friend and foe
On Christian love — one couplet translating ‘Dileccio proximi malum non operatur’ (Rom. 13.10) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5974-1
67.   f. 47v   To every praising is knit a knot
Praise comes with a price — two couplets in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 6075-1
68.   f. 48   True withouten quaintise and feigning
True esteem — one monorhyming quatrain translating ‘Vera sine simulacione dupplicitatis…’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 5627-1
69.   f. 48   They that been true in loving
The fruits of true love — one couplet translating ‘Fideles in dileccione acquiescent ei’ (Wis. 3.9) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2725-1
70.   f. 48v   It is doubt in mans richesse
The problem of wealth — one couplet translating ‘Cum quis positus in prosperitate diligitur, incertum valde est vtrum possessor vel prosperitas diligatur’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 6639-1
71.   f. 49   Whoso will been rich and having
The price of wealth — one couplet translating ‘Nam qui diuites volunt fieri…’ (1 Tim. 6.9) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2422-1
72.   f. 49   If thy goods will it been thine
On worldly goods — one proverbial couplet translating ‘Da tua dum tua sunt: post mortem tunc tua non sunt’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 512.2-1
73.   f. 49   Better is the poor in his simplesse
On wealth — one couplet translating ‘Melior est pauper ambulans in simplicitate sua…’ (Prov. 19:1) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5917-1
74.   f. 49v   Through sweetness of lore in preaching
How pastors should care for souls — three monorhyming lines translating ‘Per dulcedinem doctrine in predicando’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1057-1
75.   f. 49v   Cometh ye children me for to hearen
A translation of ‘Venite filii audite me…’ (Ps. 33.12) — one couplet following this text in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 6012-1
76.   f. 50   To the flower springing
Pleasures worth attending to — one monorhyming quatrain in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 5296-1
77.   f. 51   The gift faileth not with skill
On almsgiving — one couplet translating ‘Nuncquam est manus vacua munere dum mens impletur bona voluntate’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5296-2
78.   f. 51v   The gift faileth not with skill
On almsgiving — one couplet translating ‘Nuncquam est manus vacua munere dum mens impletur bona voluntate’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5048-1
79.   f. 52   Such semblant Christ shall maken to thee above
The reward for following Christ — one couplet translating ‘Tali wultu respiciet te Dominus ea que facis cum quali facis’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1156-1
80.   f. 53v   Drunkenship breaketh
The effects of drink — a proverbial couplet translating ‘Ebrietas frangit quicquid sapientia tangit’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon note
Number 3169-1
81.   f. 54v   Longing liking lasting on ruth
On Christ’s faithfulness — one couplet in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 1148-1
82.   f. 56v   Dread and love hate and good
A proverbial couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notes, paraphrasing ‘Quatuor ista: timor, odio, dileccio, census’, which precedes it
Number 3371-1
83.   f. 58   Man ne hath not grace for God give it not
God’s grace — one couplet translating ‘Homo non habet graciam non quia hanc non dat Deus’, attributed in the MS to Anselm, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 783-1
84.   f/ 58   Bear the well and humbly
XII Gradus Humilitatis secundum Bernardum — seven couplets
Number 5243-1
85.   f. 58v   The day taketh his light
A morning grace — two couplets introduced by ‘Wanne þe sunne rist’ in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6793-1
86.   f. 60v   Worlds joy is mingled with woe
De Gloria Mundi: on the instability of worldly bliss — one six-line stanza in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 567-1
87.   f. 60v   As a sea flowing
Gloria mundi est — four lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 2108-1
88.   f. 61   I am bliss of mickle light
De Gloria Eterna’ — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 764-1
89.   f. 64   Be low and loving
Be Humble and Shrive Thee Oft — three couplets
Number 3267-15
90.   f. 64v   Love God over all thing
Love God, thyself, thy friend and thy foe (4 lines), a tag in the Fasciculus morum
Number 1126-1
91.   f. 64v   Diabolus through pride of heart and heaviness
Four enemies of salvation — two couplets in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 6525-1
92.   f. 68v   While thou art in wealth and weal
Friends are fickle — two couplets translating ‘Tempore felici multi tibi numerantur amici’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2801-1
93.   f. 69   Jesu Christ and all mankind
On ingratitude — two couplets translating ‘Lex et natura Christus simul omnia iura / Dampnant ingratum plangung illum fore natum’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 778-1
94.   f. 69   Be thee well be thee woe
On the vanity of life — two couplets following ‘Lex et natura…’, which they translate in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 3510-3
95.   f. 69v   Mine hearts joy is went away
Two couplets, translating Lamentations 5:15-16
Number 4328-1
96.   f. 69v   Our pains been grill and fell
Beware of Hell — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3037-1
97.   f. 70v   Law and lose and rich
On oaths — one couplet translating ‘Lex et fama fies deuerencia caucio dampni / Defectus veri tibi dant iurare licenter’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5130-1
98.   f. 75   That fasting withouten alms is of might
On fasting — one proverbial couplet translating ‘Tale est ieiunium sine eleemosyna qualis sine oleo lucerna’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 6517-1
99.   f. 76v   While men and women wonen together
The seeds of lust — one proverbial couplet translating ‘Si cum viris femine habita[n]t incendiarium diaboli non deerit’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 3038-1
100.   f. 76v   Law is laid under grave
A complaint about bribery in the law — two couplets translating ‘lex est defuncta quia iudicis est manus vncta / Ob cuius vnguentum lex est in carcere tentum’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6848-1
101.   f. 77   Ye that willen heaven win
Avoid fornication — one couplet translating ‘Abstineatis vos ab omni fornicatione’ (1 Thess. 4.3) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2413-1
102.   f. 78   If thou wilt fleen lechery
Avoid bad company — two couplets translating ‘Siu Venerem vitare velis loca tempora fuge / Si venis tempora venit si fugis tempora fugit’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 4951-1
103.   f. 79v   Softly sin ginneth in wind
Sin is like a snake — one couplet translating ‘Ingreditur blande set in nouissimo mordebat vt colub[er]’ (Prov. 23.31-2) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2691-1
104.   f. 79v   Is a robber of rents and lands
The fruits of lust — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 561-1
105.   f. 80   As a clerk witnesseth of wisdom that can
The heart as master of the tongue — two couplets translating ‘Cor lingue capud est sicud uir femine…’ written to its left in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 266-1
106.   f. 81   Alas alas this worlds bliss
A lament for worldly bliss — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon book
Number 2416-1
107.   f. 83v   If thou wilt not hear
Hear much and speak little — two couplets translating ‘Cum nihil auscultes set plurima vana loquaris’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5544-1
108.   f. 84v   Them that been naked give clothing
On works of mercy — three couplets explicating ‘Vestire nudos…’ which is written to the left in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3478-2
109.   f. 85   Mercy abide and look all day
On the Mercy of God — five couplets
Number 3215-1
110.   f. 85   Lord Jesu Thine ore
A prayer of penitence — one 6-line stanza in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1147-1
111.   f. 85v   Draw thee never to man
A proverbial couplet translating ‘Nulli se iunggit, sua quem discordia pungit’, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 4831-1
112.   f. 86   Short aren mens days
Life’s brevity — one couplet translating ‘Breues dies homis sunt numerus mensium, etc.’ (Job 14.5) written to the right of the Latin in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2721-1
113.   f. 86v   It is bitter to mans mend
The character of Death — one triplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 849-1
114.   f. 86v   Beware man I come as thief
A tag in John Grimestone’s sermon notes — one couplet
Number 4475-3
115.   f. 87   Rich and poor young and old
Proverbs of Hendyng
Number 6263-1
116.   f. 87   Whatso thou art goest here by me
Death’s warning — one monorhyming quatrain translating ‘Si quis eris qui transieris sta respice plora’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 4273-1
117.   f. 87   On morrow morn cometh all our care
Death comes suddenly — one couplet in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 2710-1
118.   f. 87   It doth harm and hate done harm
Death comes unexpectedly — one quatrain translating ‘Et nocet et nocuit semper differre paratis / Qui non est hodie cras minus aptus erit’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2382-1
119.   f. 87   If prayer or meed
Death’s inevitability — one quatrain translating ‘Si prece vel precio potuisset Mors superare…’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1900
120.   f. 87   He that time borroweth from morrow to morn
On using time — one quatrain (abab) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1803-1
121.   f. 87   Have death in mind
Keeping one’s soul safe — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1103-1
122.   f. 87   Death is a dreadful debtor
A four-line acrostic on death — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 1167-1
123.   f. 87v   Earth maked hall / and earth maked bower
‘Erthe upon erthe’
Number 4836-1
124.   f. 87v   Sicker to death to all manner men
A couplet translating, ‘Mors cunctis certa nil est incertius hora’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 4790-1
125.   f. 87v   Say thou vessel of wretchedness
Two couplets translating ‘Dic homo vas scelerum quid prodest copia rerum / In modica fossa clauderis pellis et ossa’, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 4787-1
126.   f. 87v   Say now man what thinketh thou
A cross-rhymed quatrain translating, ‘Dic homo quid speres…’, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3390-1
127.   f. 87v   Man weeneth ever for to liven
Admonition to prepare for Death — a quatrain translating ‘Vir vitam querit non sentit quod morietur / Morti sternetur sic homo falsus erit’ which preceds it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3364-1
128.   f. 87v   Man is but a frail thing
On mortality — two couplets translating ‘Est homo res fragilis’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2031-1
129.   f. 87v   His colour blacketh
Signs of Death — four lines
Number 2005-1
130.   f. 87v   Here shall I dwellen locken under stone
Two couplets translating ‘Hic habitabo clausus in tumulo’ in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1361-1
131.   f. 87v   For I am poor withouten friends
A dead person speaks — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 403-1
132.   f. 87v   All we liven hapfully
Verses translating ‘Viuimus hic sorte, noli spem ponere morte’ which precedes it — one quatrain in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 5535-1
133.   f. 90v   The world with is fared [Þe werd with is faired]
Quatuor tortores hominis in mundo’, a tag from the Castell of Love (5131) — eight lines (abababab) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1105-1
134.   f. 91v   Death is life
Paradoxes of faith — two short couplets with Latin prose comments to the right in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 3710-9
135.   f. 93   Not mans steven but good will
Four lines translating ‘Non vox set votum. Non musica cordula set cor’, etc., a tag in the Fasciculus Morum, which precedes it
Number 5542-1
136.   f. 95   Thee then we beseeken thy servants do good
A couplet from the Te Deum translating, ‘Te ergo quesumus famulis tuis subueni quos precioso sanguine redimisti’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook — one couplet
Number 4303-1
137.   f. 95   Our Father that art in heaven anon
The Pater Noster — three quatrains in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2731-1
138.   f. 96   It is full lightly I-born
De Obediencia — two couplets translating ‘Portatur leuiter quod portat quisque libenter’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1243-1
139.   f. 97   Eyen to seeing
On obedience — five monorhyming lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notes following ‘Oculos parat visui…’ attributed in the MS to Jerome
Number 6634-1
140.   f. 98   Whoso thought of his birth
To think of one’s birth points us to death — one quatrain translating ‘Si quis sentiret
quo tendit et vnde veniret…’
which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5008-1
141.   f. 98   Sorrowfulhood of death that stands and waiteth thee
Four things of which to be mindful — two couplets translating ‘Mos tua mors domini fraus mundi gloria celi / Et dolor inferni sint meditanda tibi’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 899-1
142.   f. 98   Busily give thee to lore
Proverbial advice on the value of study — two couplets translating ‘Viue vacans studio, quasi numquam sis moriturus…’ which precedes it in both instances in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 5849-1
143.   f. 99v   Thou shendest me sore with thy looking
Debate between the Heart and the Eye — four couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5959-1
144.   f. 101v   To a false treasurer
Peccator assimilatur’ — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1327-1
145.   f. 103   Flee the ditch of sin
On avoiding sin — one couplet paraphrasing ‘Tu caueas caueas ne perias per eas’, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 237-1
146.   f. 103v   After that the apple was eaten
Adam’s Fall — one long couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon book
Number 40-1
147.   f. 104   A filth that God almighty hateth
On sin — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6620-1
148.   f. 104v   Whoso loveth not to do aright
A proverbial couplet, translating ‘Qui male agit odit lucem’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 3680-1
149.   f. 104v   Ne bring thou not thyself too low
Warning against the pleasures of lust — four lines translating ‘Nulli confundi misera dulcedine mundi…’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1385-1
150.   f. 104v   For that apple that Eve took
Eve’s fall and Mary’s redemption — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notes interlineated with Latin prose lines which they translate
Number 274-1
151.   f. 104v   Alas for sins that I have wrought
A sinner’s lament — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon book following ‘Quilibet peccator potest dicere Amen
Number 4352-1
152.   f. 105v   Peace be / In virtue of thee
One couplet, translating ‘Fiat pax in virtute tua’ (Ps. 121.7) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 6471-1
153.   f. 108v   When thou makest ingoing
Modest behavior — one quatrain (abab) translating ‘Qui facis ingressum studeas sic esse modestus…’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5459.7-1
154.   f. 108v   The ship in the sailing
Three dangerous things — three monorhyming lines to the right of and translating ‘Nauis in pelago’ in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5437-1
155.   f. 112   The poor man overall lieth still
On poverty — one couplet translating ‘Pauper vbique iacet dum sua bursa tacet’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6540.5-6
156.   f. 117   White was his naked breast and red of blood his side
Augustine’s Candet nudatum pectus, etc. — four long lines
Number 3376-3
157.   f. 117   Man sicker help hast thou and prest
The Virgin Mary and her Son, Man’s Advocates — three couplets
Number 5019-1
158.   f. 118v   Spear and cross nail death and thorn
Christ speaks of his sufferings — one couplet translating ‘Lancea crux claui mors spine quam toilleraui’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 4812-1
159.   f. 118v   Set fast Thy foot on Rood tree
Turn to the Cross — one quatrain translating ‘In cruce fige pedem de Christo fac tibi sedem / Frondes carpe tibi fructus amoris ibi’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2080-1
160.   f. 118v   How hard it was and what distress
Christ speaks from the Cross — one monorhyming quatrain in John Grimestone’s sermon book explicating ‘Mors mea quam dura fuir, indicat ista figura’, which precedes it
Number 1764-1
161.   f. 118v   Hand head foot heart
Christ’s wounds — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6582-1
162.   f. 119   Who thee thus beset Jesu my sweet life
One couplet translating ‘Quis te lesit ita Iesu dulcissima vita…’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5928-1
163.   f. 119   Thus is all the heart of man
Christ’s loving heart — two couplets translating ‘Sic transformatur cor amantis in id quod amatur’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3281-2
164.   f. 119   Love made Christ in our lady to light
On the Love of Christ — four rhyming lines (aa) appearing twice in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2699-1
165.   f. 119   Is wan of beating
Christ’s crucified face — one monorhyming quatrain in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook introduced by ‘Apparet mihi quod facies Christi
Number 2690-1
166.   f. 119   Is a privy poison
Sanguis Christi: Drink it in faith — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2411-1
167.   f. 119   If thou wilt been strong in fight
Think on Christ — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1903-1
168.   f. 119   He that was all neven with him that all hath wrought
A verse translation of ‘Semetipsum exinaniuit formam serui accipiens, etc.’ (Phil. 2.6-7) which precedes it — two couplets in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 1766-1
169.   f. 119   Hard gates I have go
Christ’s lament — four monorhyming lines
Number 1028-1
170.   f. 119   Christs body melts
Christ’s sacrifice — two couplets commenting on ‘Corpus Christi liquessebat’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 998-1
171.   f. 119   Christ lay an loud grede
On Christ’s Blood — four monorhyming lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 985-1
172.   f. 119   Christ cried when He prayed forgiveness of our sin
Christ’s tears — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 350-1
173.   f. 119   All My blood for thee is shed
Christ’s appeal — one couplet
Number 287-1
174.   f. 119   Alas Jesu Thy love is lorn
A lament for Christ on account of sin, in John Grimestone’s sermon notes — three lines
Number 1568-1
175.   f. 119v   God Lord that sits in throne
A prayer for remembrance of the Passion — six couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 162-1
176.   f. 119v   A sorry beverage it is and sore it is a-bought
Christ’s Prayer in Gethsemane — two monorhyming quatrains
Number 2853-1
177.   ff. 119va   Jesu God is becomen man
A song of Jesus — twenty-two lines each beginning with ‘Ihesu’ in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 2119-1
178.   f. 119vb   I am Jesu that come to fight
Jesus, Man’s Champion — two quatrains
Number 752-1
179.   f. 120   Bare was that white breast / And red the bloody side
Augustine’s Candet nudatum pectus — three quatrains
Number 3300-1
180.   ff. 120-120v   Lullay lullay little child child rest thee a throw
A Lullaby of the Virgin Mary — 32 lines (alternating aaaa with multiple couplets) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5089-1
181.   f. 120   Sweet Son rue on me and burst out of Thy bonds
The Lament of the Virgin Mary at the Cross — three monorhyming quatrains in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 818-1
182.   f. 120v   Behold woman a doleful sight
Dialogue between Christ and the Virgin — three quatrains
Number 154-3
183.   f. 120vb   A shield of red a cross of green
The ‘Arms of Christ’ — three couplets
Number 3282-1
184.   f. 121   Love me brought
Christ’s Love-Song to Man — three 6-line stanzas (aabccb) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5853-1
185.   f. 121ra   Thou that hangest there so high
A dialogue between Christ on the Cross and the Virgin Mary — three quatrains in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3326-1
186.   f. 121rb   Maiden and mother come and see / Thy child is nailed to a tree
A dialogue between the Virgin Mary and her son — eighteen couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6108-1
187.   f. 121v   Undo thy door my spouse dear
Ecce sto ad hostium et pulso’, Appeal of Christ to his leman and the reply — two 6-line stanzas and five couplets
Number 1027-1
188.   f. 121v   Christs blood the high of life three things it hath undone
On the three virtues of Christ’s blood, in John Grimestone’s sermon notes — two couplets
Number 995-1
189.   f. 121v   Christ is offered for mans sake
On redemption by Christ’s Passion, in John Grimestone’s sermon notes — one couplet with ‘Immolatus est Christus’ written to the right
Number 308-1
190.   f. 121v   Alas woe shall mine heart slacken
Mary’s lament at the Cross — one 8-line stanza
Number 904-1
191.   f. 121vb   But I me bethought
A Remembrance of the Passion — one 9-line stanza in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 5631-1
192.   f. 122   Thine heart with spear sticked
Verses asserting that Mercy is assured through the Pains of Christ — one six-line stanza in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5449-1
193.   f. 122   The red streams running
The Senses and the Crucifixion — two couplets as sermon heads with Latin side notes: ‘Respiciamus: oculis, auribus, gustu, tactu’ in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3630-1
194.   f. 122   My lord with heart I pray thee withouten voice will still
Oracio bona — one couplet from John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 3535-1
195.   f. 122   More love may no man show
On suffering love — one couplet translating ‘Maiorem caritatem nemo habet, etc.’ (Jn 15.13) which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3590-1
196.   f. 122   My dear leman behold thou me
Christ on the tree — four couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2233-1
197.   f. 122   I ne may leven on no manner
A mourning song of the Passion — two quatrains explicating ‘Non me possum continere’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 814-1
198.   f. 122   Behold thou man here might thou see
Appeal of Christ to Man his ‘Lemman’ — two couplets following ‘Stes homo respicias’ in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 3043-3
199.   f. 122rb   Learn to love as I love thee
The Christ Child Shivering with Cold: a dialogue between Christ and the Virgin Mary — five 6-line stanzas (aabccb)
Number 2566-2
200.   ff. 122va-123vb   In place as man may see / When a child to school shall set be
An ABC poem on the Passion — in 6-line stanzas
Number 701-1
201.   f. 123vb   At Doomsday we shall uprise
A song of Doomsday — one 6-line stanza in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 6789-2
202.   f. 124   Worlds bliss have good day
A renunciation of the world — twenty-two lines, 8 couplets and two triplets
Number 5291-1
203.   f. 124   The garland that of thorn is wrought
The Wounds as remedies against the Seven Deadly Sins — seven 8-line stanzas (ababcdcd) in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 4849-1
204.   f. 124v   Sinful man bethink and see
O homo vide quid pro te patior’ — five couplets
Number 5850-1
205.   f. 124va-124vb   Thou sighest sore
A song of the Passion, in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook — four six-line stanzas (aabccb) and burden: ‘Lu[u]eli ter of loueli eyȝe / Qui dostu me so wo / Sorful ter of sorful eyȝe / Þu brekst myn herte ato’
Number 804-1
206.   f. 124vb   Behold man what is my woe / There I hang upon the tree
Appeal of Christ to Man from the Cross — two quatrains
Number 1641-1
207.   f. 124vb   Gold and all this worlds win is nought but Christs rood
I would be clothed in Christ’s skin — one 8-line stanza (abababab) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5636-1
208.   f. 125   Think man thy love was dear I-bought
Christ’s words to man — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3598-2
209.   f. 125   My folk now answer me
Popule meus quid feci tibi’ — eleven quatrains (abab)
Number 812-1
210.   f. 125   Behold the thorns mine head han throngen how sharp that it been
Lamentacio dolorosa’ (Appeal of Christ to Man from the Cross) — fourteen long lines in couplets
Number 4446-1
211.   f. 125v   Readily without abiding
The manner of turning to God — three couplets with internal rhyme in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook, introduced by ‘ȝe suln turnen to God’.
Number 3634-1
212.   f. 125v   My love is fall upon a may
Christ the Champion for Love — four couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 71-1
213.   f. 125va   A Jesu so fair and free / Sweetest of all thing
A hymn of love to Jesus, vaguely based on the preceding Latin, O amor vehemens, Iesu dulcissime… — one 8-line stanza
Number 6843-2
214.   f. 125vb   Ye that passen by the way
O vos omnes qui transitis per viam — four long lines translating Lamentations 1.12
Number 6135-1
215.   f. 125vb   Upon the Rood I am for thee
Christ’s words from the cross — two couplets translating ‘In cruce sum pro te’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6160-1
216.   f. 126ra-126rb   Water and blood for thee I sweat
Christ’s appeal from the cross, in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook — four quatrains (abab), interspersed in Latin sermon
Number 1814-7
217.   f. 128v   Have one God in worship
The Ten Commandments — generally eight long lines
Number 355-1
218.   ff. 130v-131ra   All our weal and all our life
Christ’s Wounds as Remedies for the Deadly Sins — seven quatrains with Latin couplets before and between in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1675-1
219.   f. 131   Gula is shameles
Evils of the times — one seven-line stanza in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5284-1
220.   f. 134   The foot of thy will be bound in the bond of chastity
The bonds of religious life — two couplets translating ‘Oportet enim quod / Pedes tue affeccionis stringantur vinculo castitatis’ which they precede in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 5003-1
221.   f. 136   Soothly with true sins forsaking
Christ’s work and our response — seven lines translating their Latin equivalents (f. 135v) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 4218-1
222.   f. 140v   Of the graces that God hath thee sent
Man’s answer to God at the judgment — three monorhyming lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook introduced ‘Oportet te reddere racionem
Number 2398-1
223.   f. 143v   If thou be rich and wise in lore
The fruits of pride — one quatrain translating ‘Si tibi copia si sapientia formaque detur’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 5641-1
224.   f. 144   Think of thy coat that is bright and gay
A proverbial warning against pride — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2741-1
225.   f. 144rb   It is not worth to a child his friends goodness
Virtue is not hereditary — one quatrain translating ‘Nil prodest filio probitas parentis’ etc. which precedes it (left column) in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 6229-1
226.   f. 144v   What heileth a man why is he proud [Wat heylet man qui is he prud]
On the Vanity of Mortal Life, in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook — six couplets
Number 1663-1
227.   f. 146ra   Great heaviness of blood
On pride — two couplets translating ‘Nobilitas generis, prelacio copia rerum’, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 811-1
228.   f. 146v   Behold now man what thou shalt be
On the vanity of life — one quatrain based on ‘Vide, qualis eris, [qui] mundi guadia queris’, which is written to the left
Number 1090-1
229.   f. 151v   Cunne to speak worship is
On speaking and keeping silent — one couplet translating ‘Scire loquir decus est decus est et scire tacere / Hec duo si poteris scire peritus eris’ which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1834-3
230.   f. 151v   He is wise that can be ware ere him be woe
On the Wise Man — a single monorhyming quatrain
Number 2420-3
231.   f. 151va   If thou wise be will / Six keep thou which I thee ken
Six rules against the sins of the tongue — one quatrain translating two Latin hexameters inserted in two MSS of the Book of Vices and Virtues, and also occuring separately
Number 2406-1
232.   f. 152   If thou seekest love and wilt Him find
Holiness the Road to Love and Honor — three couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1410-1
233.   f. 154   For to crien to God for help in all our needs
Advice for spiritual living — four monorhyming lines with internal rhyme in John Grimestone’s sermon notes on II Cor. 6.2
Number 5822-1
234.   f. 154rb   Thou fair flees that art me dear
Time as friend as foe — two couplets translating ‘O quam cara caro rationi consona raro’ which is written to the left of the English in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2087-1
235.   f. 154v   How short a feast it is the joy of all this world
The fruits of worldly joys — four lines translating ‘Quam breue festum est hec mundi gaudia’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 1366-1
236.   f. 154v   For lore of goods I weep sore
Make wise use of Time — one quatrain in John Grimestone’s sermon notes preceding ‘Dampna fleo rerum, set plus fleo dampna dierum
Number 6341-7
237.   f. 154va-154vb   When I think things three
Three sorrowful things — six lines
Number 899-2
238.   f. 154va   Busily give thee to lore
Proverbial advice on the value of study — two couplets translating ‘Viue vacans studio, quasi numquam sis moriturus…’ which precedes it in both instances in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 6527-1
239.   f. 154vb   While time is of forgiving
Repent now — two couplets translating ‘Peniteant miseri dum temus sit miserendi…’ which precedes them in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 4406-1
240.   f. 157vb   Pride of heart and high bearing
Four evils to which those not tempted are susceptible — one monorhyming quatrain translating ‘Cordis eleuacio mentis et corporis vagacio’ which is written to its left in John Grimestone’s preaching notebook
Number 6683-1
241.   f. 158v   Will is good well for to do
Using our will — one couplet translating ‘[…] mihi adiacet perficere autem non inuenio’, which precedes it in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 1308-1
242.   f. 162   Few hearers
Evils of the times — four monorhyming lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notes
Number 6725-1
243.   f. 166v   With fleece all bespread
Christ’s saving work — two couplets in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 3091.2-1
244.   f. 166v   Shalt dreaden God for he wrought thee
Our relationship to God — one monrhyming quatrain in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook
Number 2289.4-1
245.   f. 166v   …ness an buxomness
On Christ’s life — three monorhyming lines in John Grimestone’s sermon notebook introduced ‘Nota quod via Christi vel vita fuit
Number 386-1
246.   f. 166v   All the way that God goth by
God’s mercy — one couplet in John Grimestone’s sermon notes translating ‘Omnes vie Domini tue misericoridia et veritas‘ (Tobias 3:2) which precedes it