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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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Found Records:
Cambridge UK, Magdalene College Pepys 2553
Number 4868-3
1.   p. 56 (formerly 52)   Sir John the Rose one thing there is compiled
William Dunbar, ‘The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie’ — 552 lines in 8-line stanzas
Number 3781-2
2.   pp. 3-5   Now listen of an gentle knight
William Dunbar, Of Sir Thomas Norray — nine 6-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 2680-2
3.   p. 3   Into their dark and drublie days
William Dunbar, ‘Medtatioun in wynter’, 5-line stanzas
Number 2267-2
4.   pp. 5-6   I seek about this world unstable
William Dunbar, ‘Of the changes of life’ — four 5-line stanzas
Number 1447-2
5.   pp. 6-7   Freedom honour and nobleness
William Dunbar, ‘Of covetyce’ — eleven quatrains with refrain: ‘All all for causs of cuvetice’
Number 4859-2
6.   pp. 7-8   Sir at this feast of beneficence
William Dunbar, ‘Quhone mony benefices vakit’ — three 5-line stanzas
Number 4151-2
7.   pp. 8-9   Of benefice at every feast
William Dunbar, To the King — six five-line stanzas with refrain
Number 929-2
8.   p. 8   By diverse ways and operations
William Dunbar, ‘Aganis the Solistaris in Court’ — thirteen couplets
Number 6003-2
9.   pp. 9-10   To speak of science craft or sapience
William Dunbar, ‘Learning vain without guid lyfe’ or ‘Dunbar at Oxenfurde’ — three 8-line stanzas with refrain, ‘A paralous lyfe is vain prosperitie’
Number 4865-2
10.   pp. 10-11   Sir I complain of injuries
William Dunbar, ‘Complaint to the King against Mure’ — four 7-line stanzas
Number 2660-2
11.   pp. 11-12   In vice most vicious he excels
William Dunbar, ‘Aganis treason: Epitaphe for Donald Owre’ — eight 6-line stanzas
Number 4164-2
12.   pp. 12-16   Of February the fifteenth night
William Dunbar, ‘The Dance of the Sevin Deidly Synnis’ — 120 lines, generally in 12-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 1064-2
13.   pp. 16-18   Complain I would wist I whom til
William Dunbar, ‘A Complaint to the King’ — 76 lines, in couplets
Number 3782-2
14.   p. 18   Now loves comes with largess loud
William Dunbar, ‘The Petition of the Gray Horse, Auld Dunbar’ — eleven 6-line stanzas including 2-line refrain, ‘…Schir lat It neuer In toume be tald / That I suld be ane ȝowllis ȝald’, and a concluding ‘Responsio Regis’ in four couplets
Number 5739-2
15.   pp. 51-53   This night in my sleep I was aghast
William Dunbar, ‘The Devillis Inquest’ — thirteen or seventeen 5-line stanzas (aabab) with refrain, ‘Renunce ȝour god and cum to me’.
Number 4495-2
16.   pp. 53-54   Right early on Ash Wednesday
William Dunbar, ‘The twa cummeris’ — six 5-line stanzas with refrain
Number 4868-2
17.   pp. 57-58 (formerly 53-54); pp. 69-72; pp. 77-80; pp. 59-63   Sir John the Rose one thing there is compiled
William Dunbar, ‘The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie’ — 552 lines in 8-line stanzas
Number 4493-1
18.   pp. 64-66; pp. 73-76; pp. 81   Right as the star of day began to shine
William Dunbar, The Golden Targe — thirty-one 9-line stanzas
Number 6134-1
19.   pp. 81-96   Upon the Midsummer even merriest of nights
William Dunbar, ‘The tretis of the tua mariit wemen and the wedo’ — 530 lines in non-rhyming alliterative long lines
Number 4483-3
20.   pp. 96-105   Right as all strings are ruled in an harp
De regimene principum bonum consilium’ inserted in the Liber Pluscardiensis — 44 rhyme royal stanzas
Number 4290-1
21.   pp. 105-107   One thousand year three hundred ninety and one
The Duke of Orleans’ Defence of the Scots, an extract from Wyntoun’s Chronicle (658), occurring separately — 64 lines in couplets.
Number 726-1
22.   pp. 113-129   At Tweeds mouth there stands a noble town
‘The Freiris of Berwick’, sometimes ascribed to William Dunbar — 589 lines in couplets (with introductory couplet: ‘As it befell and happinit into deid &c.’)
Number 6158-1
23.   pp. 129-135   Was never in Scotland heard nor seen
Attributed to King James I — 23 x 9-line stanzas, ababbcbcd including refr. ‘At chrystis kirk on the grene’
Number 2224-2
24.   pp. 135-138   I Master Andro Kennedy
William Dunbar, ‘The Testament of Mr Andro Kennedy’ — thirteen 8-line macaronic stanzas and a concluding 12-line stanza
Number 4164-3
25.   pp. 160-162   Of February the fifteenth night
William Dunbar, ‘The Dance of the Sevin Deidly Synnis’ — 120 lines, generally in 12-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 3692-1
26.   pp. 162-165   Next that a tournament was tried
‘The justis betuix the tailyeour and sowtar’, by William Dunbar — nine 12-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 2536-1
27.   pp. 165-168   In May as that Aurora did upspring
William Dunbar, ‘The Merle and the Nichtingaill’ — fifteen eight-line stanzas with alternating refrains, ‘A lusty lyfe in luves seruice bene’ and ‘All luve is lost bot vpone god allone'’
Number 3578-1
28.   pp. 168-170   Musing alone this ender night
‘Of deming’, possibly by William Dunbar — eleven 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘So sall I nocht vndemit be’
Number 390-2
29.   p. 171   All thing in kind desireth thing I-like
John Lydgate, ‘Rime without Accord’ or ‘On the Inconsistency of Men’s Actions’ — usually eleven 8-line stanzas with refrain
Number 3938-2
30.   pp. 173-176   O Immensa Trinitas Father and Son maker of all
A macaronic prayer to the Trinity — twelve 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc); first two stanzas, ababbaba ababbaba; including refrain, ‘O lux beata trinitas’
Number 6298-1
31.   pp. 176-178   When fair Flora the goddess of all flowers
Robert Henryson, ‘The Ressoning Betuix Aige and Yowth’ — nine 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc including alternate refrains, ‘O ȝowth be glaid into þi flouris grene’ and ‘O ȝowth þi flouris sedis fellone sone’
Number 5876-2
32.   pp. 178-181   This wavering worlds wretchedness
William Dunbar, ‘Of the Warldis Instabilitie’ — twenty-five quatrains with refrain, ‘For to considder is ane pane’
Number 5855-2
33.   pp. 186-187   Thou that in heaven for our salvation
William Dunbar, ‘Ane orisoun quhen the governour past into France’ — five eight-line stanzas with refrain, ‘For but thy helpe this kynrick is forlorne’
Number 1124-1
34.   pp. 187-189   Devoured with dream devising in my slumber
‘A general satyre’ ascribed to William Dunbar (and also to James Inglis) — sixteen 5-line stanzas (aabab) with internal rhyme in first four lines (so ababcdcbb) including refrain, ‘Within þis land wes neuir hard nor sene’
Number 2291-1
35.   pp. 189-192   I that in health was and gladness
William Dunbar, ‘Lament for the Makars’ — twenty-five quatrains with refrain: ‘Timor mortis conturbat me
Number 6319-1
36.   pp. 192-193   When holy kirk first flowerest in youthhood
Gawin Douglas, On Conscience — four stanzas (ababbab)
Number 3464-1
37.   pp. 193-194   Memento homo quod cinis me
‘Of manis mortalite’ by William Dunbar — six 8-line stanzas with refrain: ‘Quod tu in cinerem reverteris
Number 4863-1
38.   pp. 194-195   Sir for your grace both night and day
William Dunbar, To the King, ‘That he war Jhone Thomsonnis man’ — eight quatrains with refrain, ‘God ȝif ye war Johne Thomsonnis man’
Number 4101-1
39.   pp. 195-196   O wretch beware this world will wend thee fro
William Dunbar, ‘Of the Warldis Vanitie’ — three 8-line stanzas with refrain, ‘Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas
Number 4874-1
40.   pp. 196-198   Sir ye have many servitors
William Dunbar, A Remonstrance to the King — 88 lines in couplets
Number 6021-1
41.   pp. 199-203   To Thee O merciful saviour mine Jesu
William Dunbar, ‘The tabill of confessioun’ — 19 stanzas, usually of 8 lines, ababbcbc, two of 10 lines, abababbcbc, with refrain, ‘I cry the mercy and lasar to repent’
Number 467-1
42.   pp. 203-206   Among these friars within an cloister
William Dunbar, ‘Of the passioun of Christ’ — twelve 8-line stanzas with refrain: ‘O mankynd for the lufe of the’
Number 3488-1
43.   pp. 206-207   Methought compassion void of fears
‘Of the Passioun of Christ’ by William Dunbar — six 8-line stanzas with refrain: ‘Thys blissit saluator chryst Iesu’
Number 707-1
44.   p. 208   At matin hours in the mids of the night
Walter Kennedy, ‘The Praise of Aige’, — five 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including refrain, ‘Honour with aige to every vertew drawis’
Number 1247-1
45.   pp. 210-211   Fain would I with all diligence
‘The Danger of Wryting’, attributed to William Dunbar — seven 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘Thus wait I nocht quhairof to wryt’
Number 1859-1
46.   pp. 212-213   He that has gold and great riches
William Dunbar, ‘Ane his awin ennemy’ — five 5-line stanzas with alternating refrains, ‘He wirkis sorow to him sell’ and ‘I gif him to the dewill of hell’
Number 1316-1
47.   pp. 220-221   First largess my king my chief
William Stewart, ‘Largess of this New Year Day’ — ten 5-line stanzas (aabab) and burden: ‘Lerges lerges lerges ay / Lerges of this new yeirday’
Number 767-1
48.   pp. 221-222   Be merry man and take nought far in mind
William Dunbar, ‘Without glaidnes awailis no tressour’ — five 8-line stanzas including this refrain
Number 4523-1
49.   pp. 222-223   Sad and solitary sitting mine alone
‘Think on thy end and thow sall never syn’ — five 8-line stanzas with this refrain
Number 2478-1
50.   pp. 224-225   In bale be blithe for that is best
‘In baill be blyth for it is best’ — five 8-line stanzas with this refrain
Number 3375.5-1
51.   pp. 225-226   Man sen thy life is ay in weir
‘Advice to spend anis awin gude’ by William Dunbar — ten quatrains with refrain: ‘man spend thy gude quhill thow hes space’
Number 2995-1
52.   pp. 226-256   King Hart in his comely castle strong
King Hart, attributed to Gavin Douglas — 960 lines in 8-line stanzas
Number 4161-2
53.   pp. 259-260   Of every asking follows nought
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in asking’ — nine 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘In asking sowld discretioun be’
Number 6002-2
54.   pp. 260-261   To speak of gifts of almsdeeds
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in geving’ — twelve 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘In geving sowld discretioun be’
Number 230-2
55.   pp. 261-262   After giving I speak of taking
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in taking’ — ten 5-line stanzas including refrain: ‘In taking sowld discretioun be’
Number 6176-2
56.   pp. 290-292   We that are here in heavens glory
William Dunbar, ‘The Dregy maid to the kyng’ — 110 lines in couplets and responses of six lines, ababcc
Number 5799-3
57.   p. 292   This worldly joy is only fantasy
Leaulte vault Richesse,’ on the Instability of Worldly Joy — one eight-line stanza (ababbcbc)
Number 3076-1
58.   p. 292   Lief love my love no longer it like
Walter Kennedy, ‘Pious Counsale’ — two 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 6396-2
59.   p. 293   When pride is in price
A political prophecy for Scotland’s prosperity in A.D. 1581, incorporating a version of the Abuses of the Age — 14 lines in couplets
Number 5112-2
60.   p. 294   Take time in time and no time defer
Four moralizing couplets
Number 6554-3
61.   p. 294   Who of plenty will take no heed
A moralizing couplet, included in a longer series of proverbs against lending money
Number 2994-7
62.   p. 294   King counsel-less / Bishop loreless
The Abuses of the Age: rhyming lines ending in -les
Number 6330-2
63.   p. 294   When I lend I am a friend
Two couplets on the incommodities of lending
Number 2757-2
64.   p. 294   It that I give I have / It that I lend I crave
Moralizing lines on lending money — eight lines
Number 3789-1
65.   pp. 294-295   Now of women this I say for me
William Dunbar, ‘In prais of wemen’ — 34 lines in couplets
Number 5058-2
66.   pp. 295-296; pp. 309   Sure ye remember as of before
William Dunbar, To the King — seventeen 5-line stanzas with refrain: ‘Exces of thocht dois me mischeif’
Number 468-1
67.   pp. 305-306   An aged man twice forty years
Walter Kennedy, ‘Ane Aigit Manis Invective against Mouþ þankless’ — seven 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including refr. phrase, ‘…mowth thankless’
Number 6584-2
68.   p. 307   Who thinks that he has suffience
William Dunbar, ‘Of Content’ — seven 5-line stanzas
Number 2574-2
69.   pp. 308; pp. 311   In secret place this hinder night
William Dunbar, ‘Ane Brash of Wowing’ — nine 7-line stanzas including alternating refrains, ‘ȝe brek my hart my bony ane’ and ‘ffull leifis me ȝour graceles gane’
Number 1255-1
70.   pp. 309-310   False Titlaris now grows up full rank
Robert Henryson, ‘Aganis haisty Credence of Titlaris’ — seven 8-line stanzas with refrain phrase, ‘…credence’
Number 449-1
71.   pp. 310; pp. 297   Alone as I went up and down / In an abbey
Robert Henryson, ‘The Abbay Walk’ — seven 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including the refrain, ‘Obey and thank thy god of all’
Number 6235-1
72.   p. 310   What is this life but one straight way to death
William Dunbar, ‘Of lyfe’ — one stanza rhyme royal
Number 4512-2
73.   pp. 311-312   Rolling in my remembraunce
Stewart, ‘The Variance of Court’ — ten 5-line stanzas aabab, including refrain phrase ‘gud seruys’
Number 3578-2
74.   pp. 313-314   Musing alone this ender night
‘Of deming’, possibly by William Dunbar — eleven 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘So sall I nocht vndemit be’
Number 494-2
75.   pp. 314-315   An moorlands man of uplands make
William Dunbar, ‘Tydingis fra the sessioun’ — eight seven-line stanzas
Number 2267-3
76.   p. 315   I seek about this world unstable
William Dunbar, ‘Of the changes of life’ — four 5-line stanzas
Number 4859-3
77.   p. 316   Sir at this feast of beneficence
William Dunbar, ‘Quhone mony benefices vakit’ — three 5-line stanzas
Number 929-3
78.   p. 316   By diverse ways and operations
William Dunbar, ‘Aganis the Solistaris in Court’ — thirteen couplets
Number 6003-3
79.   pp. 317-318   To speak of science craft or sapience
William Dunbar, ‘Learning vain without guid lyfe’ or ‘Dunbar at Oxenfurde’ — three 8-line stanzas with refrain, ‘A paralous lyfe is vain prosperitie’
Number 845-1
80.   p. 317   Betwix twelve hours and eleven
William Dunbar, ‘þe amendis to þe telyouris and sowtaris for the turnament maid on thame’ — ten quatrains with refrain, ‘Teȝouris and sowtaris blist be ȝe’
Number 2680-3
81.   pp. 318-319   Into their dark and drublie days
William Dunbar, ‘Medtatioun in wynter’, 5-line stanzas
Number 4179-1
82.   pp. 319-320   Of Lenten in the first morning
William Dunbar, ‘All erdly joy returnis in pane’ — ten quatrains with this refrain
Number 5087-1
83.   p. 320   Sweet rose of virtue and of gentleness
William Dunbar, ‘To a ladye’ — three 5-line stanzas
Number 4151-3
84.   pp. 321-322   Of benefice at every feast
William Dunbar, To the King — six five-line stanzas with refrain
Number 3614-1
85.   pp. 322-323   My hearts treasure and sweet assured foe
‘To a Ladye quhone he list to feyne’, by William Dunbar — seven stanzas rhyme royal
Number 2090-2
86.   pp. 323-324   How should I rule me or in what wise
William Dunbar, ‘How sall I governe me’ — ten 5-line stanzas with this refrain ‘lord god how sould I governe me’
Number 5614-2
87.   pp. 324-325   These ladies fair that makes repair
William Dunbar, ‘Of the ladyis solistaris at court’ — six twelve-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 5201-2
88.   pp. 325-326   The beastly lust the furious appetite
William Dunbar, ‘Ballate aganis Evill Women’, attributed to William Dunbar — six stanzas rhyme royal
Number 4785-2
89.   p. 326   Saviour suppose my sensuality
William Dunbar, ‘Ane orisoun’ — one 8-line stanza
Number 3783-1
90.   p. 326   Now man behold this worlds vanities
Moralizing verses on the inevitability of death — five quatrains (abab), including refrain phrase, ‘…doutles þow man de’
Number 4047-1
91.   pp. 327-328   O sinful man into this mortal sea
Robert Henryson, ‘The Thre Deid Pollis’ — eight 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 4990-3
92.   pp. 329-330   Some time this world was so steadfast and stable
Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘Lak of Stedfastnesse’ — four stanzas rhyme royal, including one-stanza Envoy
Number 4496-2
93.   pp. 330-331   Right fain would I my acquaintance make
‘Sir Penny’ — seven 8-line stanzas
Number 6593-2
94.   p. 331   Whom to shall I complain my woe
William Dunbar, ‘For in this warld may non assure’ — seventeen 5-line stanzas with this refrain
Number 5737-2
95.   pp. 333-334   This night before the dawing clear
William Dunbar, ‘How Dunbar wes desyred to be ane freir’ — ten 5-line stanzas
Number 3295-2
96.   pp. 334-335   Lucina shining in silence of the night
‘The birth of Antichrist’ (or a Dream of Fortune) by William Dunbar — ten 5-line stanzas
Number 5685-2
97.   pp. 335-337   This ender night in Dumfermline
William Dunbar, ‘The Wooing of the King quhen he wes in Dumfermeling’ (The Tod and the Lamb) — ten seven-line stanzas
Number 1481-2
98.   p. 337   Full oft I muse and has in thought
William Dunbar, ‘Best to be blyth’ — eight 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘ffor to be blyth me think it best’
Number 1170-7
99.   p. 338   Earth out of earth is wonderly wrought
‘Erthe upon Erthe’
Number 5093-1
100.   p. 338   Take a webster that is leal
Three impossibilities — three couplets
Number 5519-2
101.   p. 339   The wardrober of Venus bower [The wardraipper of Venus boure]
William Dunbar, ‘Of James Doig, kepar of the quenis wardrop’ — six quatrains with refrain ‘madam ȝe heff an dangerous dog’
Number 3928-2
102.   pp. 339-340   O gracious Princess good and fair
William Dunbar, ‘Of the same James [Dog, keeper of the Queen’s Wardrobe] quhen he hed plesett him’ — six quatrains (aabb) including refrain: ‘He is na dog he is a lam’
Number 4867-2
103.   pp. 340-341   Sir John Sinclair be goeth to dance
William Dunbar, ‘Of a dance in the quenis chalmer’ — seven 7-line stanzas
Number 3166-2
104.   pp. 341-342   Long have I made of ladies white
William Dunbar, ‘On ane blakmoir’ — five 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘My ladye with the mekle lippis’
Number 3319-2
105.   p. 342   Madame your men said they would ride
‘To the Quene’ by William Dunbar: a warning against catching the pox — seven 5-line stanzas incl. refr. phrase, ‘…of þe pockis’
Number 406-2
106.   p. 356   All women have virtues noble and excellent
Richard Hatfeld, A ‘punctuation’ poem against women (two interpretations according to the punctuation adopted) — one stanza rhyme royal