SEARCH RECORDS
SEARCH MSS
PRINTED BOOKS
INSCRIPTIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHY
GLOSSARY
DIMEV HOME
The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Found Records:
Edinburgh, National Library of Scotland, Advocates’ 1.1.6 [Bannatyne MS]
Number 4010-2
1.      O my dear heart the lantern of light
To his Mistress, a letter protesting his devotion — five stanzas rhyme royal with 4-line Envoy: ‘Farewell swet harte’
Number 4091-1
2.   p. 6   O when be divine deliberation
An envoy to the Virgin Mary — six stanzas rhyme royal
Number 6021-3
3.   pp. 9-11   To Thee O merciful saviour mine Jesu
William Dunbar, ‘The tabill of confessioun’ — 19 stanzas, usually of 8 lines, ababbcbc, two of 10 lines, abababbcbc, with refrain, ‘I cry the mercy and lasar to repent’
Number 3035-4
4.   ff. 9-11v   Laud honor praisings thanks infinite
The XIII Bukes of Eneados, translated by Gavin Douglas — in couplets
Number 1024-1
5.   pp. 13-14   Criste qui lux es et dies
A macaronic hymn — seven 8-line stanzas
Number 6021-4
6.   ff. 17-19v   To Thee O merciful saviour mine Jesu
William Dunbar, ‘The tabill of confessioun’ — 19 stanzas, usually of 8 lines, ababbcbc, two of 10 lines, abababbcbc, with refrain, ‘I cry the mercy and lasar to repent’
Number 3881-1
7.   pp. 20-21   O eternal God of power infinite
Robert Henryson, ‘Prayer for the Pest’ — eleven 8-line stanzas, sometimes followed by three-stanza epilogue
Number 1024-2
8.   ff. 21-21v   Criste qui lux es et dies
A macaronic hymn — seven 8-line stanzas
Number 4080-34
9.   pp. 22-24   O thoughtful heart plunged in distress
Life of Our Lady
Number 3881-2
10.   ff. 24-25v   O eternal God of power infinite
Robert Henryson, ‘Prayer for the Pest’ — eleven 8-line stanzas, sometimes followed by three-stanza epilogue
Number 1564-3
11.   p. 24   God is a substance forever durable
God’s goodness — one stanza rhyme royal
Number 4080-35
12.   pp. 25-26   O thoughtful heart plunged in distress
Life of Our Lady
Number 4514-1
13.   ff. 27-27v   Rorate celi desuper
William Dunbar, On the Nativity — seven aureate 8-line stanzas with refrain, ‘Et nobis puer natus est
Number 3863-1
14.   pp. 27-29   O creatures create of Me your Creator
God’s or Christ’s address to sinners, urging them to repent, with the refrain, ‘And mistrest neuer for thy misdeid’ — twelve 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 3735-1
15.   f. 27   Now gladdeth every lifes creature
William Dunbar (attrib.), ‘Of the Nativitie of Christ’ — five 8-line stanzas including refrain, ‘borne of þe most chest virgin mary bricht’
Number 2787-1
16.   ff. 27v-28   Jerusalem rejoice for joy
On the Nativity, attributed to William Dunbar — five 8-line stanzas with refrain, ‘Illuminare Jerusalem
Number 1716-1
17.   f. 28   Hail Gods Son of mights most
A praising of Christ and the Virgin — thirteen 8-line stanzas with alternating refrains: ‘Beatus venter qui te portauit’ and ‘Beata vbera que suxisti
Number 4978-2
18.   pp. 29-30   Some time in Greece that noble region
Eight Goodly Questions (an expansion of part of ‘Septem Sapientium Sententiae’, by Ausonius) — nine stanzas rhyme royal
Number 449-2
19.   pp. 30-31   Alone as I went up and down / In an abbey
Robert Henryson, ‘The Abbay Walk’ — seven 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including the refrain, ‘Obey and thank thy god of all’
Number 5484-1
20.   ff. 30v-31   The star [stern] is risen of our redemption
?William Dunbar, On the Nativity, attributed to Dunbar — five 8-line stanzas with refrain: ‘The sterne is rissin of our redemptioun’
Number 3664-1
21.   ff. 31-32   My woeful heart me stounds through the veins
Christ describes his crucifixion, by [?Jhon] Clerk — eleven 8-line stanzas with refrain: ‘Benedicta sit sancta Trinitas
Number 1145-1
22.   pp. 32-34   Down by the river as I read
‘Do for thy self quhill thov art heir’, attributed to William Dunbar — ten 8-line stanzas including this refrain
Number 1061-2
23.   ff. 33v-34   Compatience pierces ruth and mercy stands
‘The Passioun of Christ’ — eight 8-line stanzas
Number 5856-2
24.   ff. 34-34v   Thou that in prayers has been lent
‘Off the Resurrectioun’ — five eight-line stanzas
Number 5060-1
25.   ff. 34v-35   Surrexit Dominus de sepulchro
William Dunbar (attrib.), On the resurrection — five 8-line stanzas with refrain, ‘Surrexit sicut dixit allalue
Number 1143-1
26.   f. 35   Done is a battle on the dragon black
William Dunbar, ‘On the Resurrection’ — five 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) including the refrain, ‘Surrexit Dominus de sepulchro
Number 707-2
27.   ff. 38-39   At matin hours in the mids of the night
Walter Kennedy, ‘The Praise of Aige’, — five 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including refrain, ‘Honour with aige to every vertew drawis’
Number 4091-2
28.   f. 39v   O when be divine deliberation
An envoy to the Virgin Mary — six stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3863-2
29.   ff. 41v-42v   O creatures create of Me your Creator
God’s or Christ’s address to sinners, urging them to repent, with the refrain, ‘And mistrest neuer for thy misdeid’ — twelve 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 6298-2
30.   pp. 42-43   When fair Flora the goddess of all flowers
Robert Henryson, ‘The Ressoning Betuix Aige and Yowth’ — nine 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc including alternate refrains, ‘O ȝowth be glaid into þi flouris grene’ and ‘O ȝowth þi flouris sedis fellone sone’
Number 4000-1
31.   pp. 43-44   O mortal man behold take tent to me
Robert Henryson, ‘The Ressoning betuix Deth and Man’ — six 8-line stanzas
Number 5315-1
32.   f. 43v   The greatest treasure without comparison
The virtues of wit — one stanza rhyme royal
Number 2678-1
33.   p. 44   In-til one garth under an red rosier
Robert Henryson, The Praise of Age — four 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) with refrain, ‘þe moyr of agis þe nerar hewynnys blyss’
Number 4161-3
34.   pp. 45-46   Of every asking follows nought
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in asking’ — nine 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘In asking sowld discretioun be’
Number 4978-3
35.   ff. 45v-46v   Some time in Greece that noble region
Eight Goodly Questions (an expansion of part of ‘Septem Sapientium Sententiae’, by Ausonius) — nine stanzas rhyme royal
Number 6002-3
36.   p. 46   To speak of gifts of almsdeeds
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in geving’ — twelve 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘In geving sowld discretioun be’
Number 449-3
37.   ff. 46v-47   Alone as I went up and down / In an abbey
Robert Henryson, ‘The Abbay Walk’ — seven 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including the refrain, ‘Obey and thank thy god of all’
Number 3464-2
38.   ff. 47-47v   Memento homo quod cinis me
‘Of manis mortalite’ by William Dunbar — six 8-line stanzas with refrain: ‘Quod tu in cinerem reverteris
Number 1439-2
39.   p. 47   Four manner of folks are evil to please
William Dunbar, ‘Of folkis evill to pleis’ — seven quatrains with refrain: ‘And wald have part fra utheris by’
Number 1124-2
40.   pp. 47-48   Devoured with dream devising in my slumber
‘A general satyre’ ascribed to William Dunbar (and also to James Inglis) — sixteen 5-line stanzas (aabab) with internal rhyme in first four lines (so ababcdcbb) including refrain, ‘Within þis land wes neuir hard nor sene’
Number 4005
41.   f. 48   O mortal man remember night and day
Memento homo quod cinis est’, ‘Quod Lichtoun’ — six 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) with this refrain
Number 4179-2
42.   f. 48v   Of Lenten in the first morning
William Dunbar, ‘All erdly joy returnis in pane’ — ten quatrains with this refrain
Number 1145-2
43.   ff. 48v-50   Down by the river as I read
‘Do for thy self quhill thov art heir’, attributed to William Dunbar — ten 8-line stanzas including this refrain
Number 707-3
44.   ff. 52v-53   At matin hours in the mids of the night
Walter Kennedy, ‘The Praise of Aige’, — five 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including refrain, ‘Honour with aige to every vertew drawis’
Number 2660-3
45.   pp. 53-54   In vice most vicious he excels
William Dunbar, ‘Aganis treason: Epitaphe for Donald Owre’ — eight 6-line stanzas
Number 6298-3
46.   ff. 55-56   When fair Flora the goddess of all flowers
Robert Henryson, ‘The Ressoning Betuix Aige and Yowth’ — nine 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc including alternate refrains, ‘O ȝowth be glaid into þi flouris grene’ and ‘O ȝowth þi flouris sedis fellone sone’
Number 4000-2
47.   ff. 56-57   O mortal man behold take tent to me
Robert Henryson, ‘The Ressoning betuix Deth and Man’ — six 8-line stanzas
Number 2678-2
48.   ff. 57-57v   In-til one garth under an red rosier
Robert Henryson, The Praise of Age — four 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) with refrain, ‘þe moyr of agis þe nerar hewynnys blyss’
Number 4047-2
49.   ff. 57v-58v   O sinful man into this mortal sea
Robert Henryson, ‘The Thre Deid Pollis’ — eight 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 4912-2
50.   ff. 58v-59   Sith through virtue increases dignity
God’s Span for Man’s Inch, attributed to James I of Scotland — 3 stanzas rhyme royal‘The Ballad of Good Counsel’, attributed to James I of Scotland — 3 stanzas rhyme royal
Number 494-3
51.   ff. 59-59v   An moorlands man of uplands make
William Dunbar, ‘Tydingis fra the sessioun’ — eight seven-line stanzas
Number 1564-4
52.   p. 60   God is a substance forever durable
God’s goodness — one stanza rhyme royal
Number 1124-3
53.   ff. 60-61   Devoured with dream devising in my slumber
‘A general satyre’ ascribed to William Dunbar (and also to James Inglis) — sixteen 5-line stanzas (aabab) with internal rhyme in first four lines (so ababcdcbb) including refrain, ‘Within þis land wes neuir hard nor sene’
Number 4161-4
54.   ff. 61-61v   Of every asking follows nought
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in asking’ — nine 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘In asking sowld discretioun be’
Number 6002-4
55.   ff. 61v-62v   To speak of gifts of almsdeeds
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in geving’ — twelve 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘In geving sowld discretioun be’
Number 230-3
56.   ff. 62v-63   After giving I speak of taking
William Dunbar, ‘Of discretioun in taking’ — ten 5-line stanzas including refrain: ‘In taking sowld discretioun be’
Number 3578-3
57.   ff. 63v-64   Musing alone this ender night
‘Of deming’, possibly by William Dunbar — eleven 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘So sall I nocht vndemit be’
Number 1447-3
58.   ff. 64v-65   Freedom honour and nobleness
William Dunbar, ‘Of covetyce’ — eleven quatrains with refrain: ‘All all for causs of cuvetice’
Number 2090-3
59.   ff. 65v-66v   How should I rule me or in what wise
William Dunbar, ‘How sall I governe me’ — ten 5-line stanzas with this refrain ‘lord god how sould I governe me’
Number 1439-3
60.   f. 66v   Four manner of folks are evil to please
William Dunbar, ‘Of folkis evill to pleis’ — seven quatrains with refrain: ‘And wald have part fra utheris by’
Number 4990-12
61.   f. 67   Some time this world was so steadfast and stable
Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘Lak of Stedfastnesse’ — four stanzas rhyme royal, including one-stanza Envoy
Number 1255-2
62.   ff. 67v-68   False Titlaris now grows up full rank
Robert Henryson, ‘Aganis haisty Credence of Titlaris’ — seven 8-line stanzas with refrain phrase, ‘…credence’
Number 5971-1
63.   ff. 68-69   To dwell in court my friend give that thou list
William Dunbar, ‘Rewl of anis self’ — six 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) with refrain
Number 1356-39
64.   ff. 73-74   For health of body cover for cold thine head
John Lydgate, ‘Dietary’ — ten 8-line stanzas
Number 4810-7
65.   f. 74   Serve thy God truly
Precepts in -ly — usually two quatrains, but sometimes in expanded versions
Number 1108-10
66.   f. 74v   Deceit deceiveth and shall be deceived
A single stanza (Bk. II, lines 4432-8) from Lydgate’s Fall of Princes (1904) — rhyme royal.
Number 5799-4
67.   f. 74v   This worldly joy is only fantasy
Leaulte vault Richesse,’ on the Instability of Worldly Joy — one eight-line stanza (ababbcbc)
Number 5934-2
68.   f. 74v   Thy beginning is barren brittleness
On the Uncertainty of Earthly Life — in rhyme royal
Number 6591-1
69.   f. 75   Who would do well he must begin at well
Verses exhorting reader to do well — one stanza rhyme royal, preceding 6526
Number 6526-2
70.   f. 75   While thou hast good and gettest good for good thou might be held
A riddling discussion on ‘Good’ — four 10-line stanzas (ababababcc) with internal rhyme and ‘0 and I’ refrain element in the 9th line
Number 3076-2
71.   f. 75   Lief love my love no longer it like
Walter Kennedy, ‘Pious Counsale’ — two 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 4490-5
72.   f. 75v   Right as poverty causeth soberness
On the Evils of Prosperity — eight lines
Number 835-10
73.   f. 75v   Better is to suffer and fortune abide
The Golden Mean — a couplet
Number 6554-4
74.   f. 75v   Who of plenty will take no heed
A moralizing couplet, included in a longer series of proverbs against lending money
Number 6235-2
75.   f. 75v   What is this life but one straight way to death
William Dunbar, ‘Of lyfe’ — one stanza rhyme royal
Number 746-1
76.   f. 75v   Ay the higher that thou art
Proverbial saying advocating humility — one couplet
Number 165-1
77.   f. 75v   A sovereign beauty over all thee leave
On the virtue of a well-bridled tongue — one couplet
Number 4483-5
78.   f. 76   Right as all strings are ruled in an harp
De regimene principum bonum consilium’ inserted in the Liber Pluscardiensis — 44 rhyme royal stanzas
Number 3457-1
79.   ff. 78-78v   Me marvels of this great confusion
The Want of Wyse Men, attributed to Robert Henryson — nine 8-line stanzas
Number 6169-1
80.   ff. 78v-79   We lords has chosen a chieftan marvelous
William Dunbar (?), ‘The lordis of Scotland to the Governor in France’, attributed to William Dunbar — five 8-line stanzas with refrain, ‘In lak of justice this realme is schent allace’
Number 390-3
81.   ff. 79-79v   All thing in kind desireth thing I-like
John Lydgate, ‘Rime without Accord’ or ‘On the Inconsistency of Men’s Actions’ — usually eleven 8-line stanzas with refrain
Number 359-10
82.   ff. 79v-80   All righeousness doth now proceed
John Lydgate, ‘Rammeshorne’ — seven 8-line stanzas including refrain, ‘As ryȝth as a rams horne’ or ‘A resoun of the Rammeshorne’
Number 2264-2
83.   ff. 81v-82   I see a ribbon rich and new
Man for the Better Abyde — seven 8-line stanzas
Number 3919-2
84.   ff. 82-83   O God that in time all things did begin
John Skelton, Poem on Time — nine 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4 stanzas rhyme royal (stanzas 7, 9, 10-11)
Number 4794-1
85.   ff. 83-83v   Say well is a worthy thing
Verses advocating that Do well is preferable to Say well — nine quatrains and burden, or 42 lines in couplets with burden: ‘Saye well & do well þey are thynges twayne / thryse happy ys he in whome bothe dothe rayne’.
Number 5061-3
86.   ff. 83v-84   Sustain abstain keep well in your mind
Advice regarding abstenance and forbearance — five stanzas rhyme royal with refrain, ‘Amonges all other for the moste happy’ or ‘Of all other shalbe most happy’
Number 6593-3
87.   ff. 84-85   Whom to shall I complain my woe
William Dunbar, ‘For in this warld may non assure’ — seventeen 5-line stanzas with this refrain
Number 6289-1
88.   ff. 89v-90   When doctors preached to win the joy eternal
On conscience, advice to the King — three 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc
Number 4512-3
89.   ff. 94-94v   Rolling in my remembraunce
Stewart, ‘The Variance of Court’ — ten 5-line stanzas aabab, including refrain phrase ‘gud seruys’
Number 5058-3
90.   ff. 94v-95v   Sure ye remember as of before
William Dunbar, To the King — seventeen 5-line stanzas with refrain: ‘Exces of thocht dois me mischeif’
Number 1316-2
91.   f. 95v   First largess my king my chief
William Stewart, ‘Largess of this New Year Day’ — ten 5-line stanzas (aabab) and burden: ‘Lerges lerges lerges ay / Lerges of this new yeirday’
Number 767-3
92.   ff. 98-98v   Be merry man and take nought far in mind
William Dunbar, ‘Without glaidnes awailis no tressour’ — five 8-line stanzas including this refrain
Number 1481-3
93.   f. 98v   Full oft I muse and has in thought
William Dunbar, ‘Best to be blyth’ — eight 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘ffor to be blyth me think it best’
Number 6158-2
94.   ff. 99-101   Was never in Scotland heard nor seen
Attributed to King James I — 23 x 9-line stanzas, ababbcbcd including refr. ‘At chrystis kirk on the grene’
Number 6176-3
95.   ff. 102-103v   We that are here in heavens glory
William Dunbar, ‘The Dregy maid to the kyng’ — 110 lines in couplets and responses of six lines, ababcc
Number 2574-3
96.   ff. 103v-104   In secret place this hinder night
William Dunbar, ‘Ane Brash of Wowing’ — nine 7-line stanzas including alternating refrains, ‘ȝe brek my hart my bony ane’ and ‘ffull leifis me ȝour graceles gane’
Number 2291-2
97.   ff. 109-110   I that in health was and gladness
William Dunbar, ‘Lament for the Makars’ — twenty-five quatrains with refrain: ‘Timor mortis conturbat me
Number 4164-4
98.   ff. 110-111   Of February the fifteenth night
William Dunbar, ‘The Dance of the Sevin Deidly Synnis’ — 120 lines, generally in 12-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 3692-2
99.   ff. 111-112v   Next that a tournament was tried
‘The justis betuix the tailyeour and sowtar’, by William Dunbar — nine 12-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 845-2
100.   ff. 112v-113   Betwix twelve hours and eleven
William Dunbar, ‘þe amendis to þe telyouris and sowtaris for the turnament maid on thame’ — ten quatrains with refrain, ‘Teȝouris and sowtaris blist be ȝe’
Number 4755-1
101.   ff. 113v-114   Saint Salvator send silver sorrow
William Dunbar, verses addressed to the King — seven 5-line stanzas including refrain, ‘My panefull purs so priclis me’
Number 5737-3
102.   ff. 115-115v   This night before the dawing clear
William Dunbar, ‘How Dunbar wes desyred to be ane freir’ — ten 5-line stanzas
Number 1859-2
103.   ff. 115v-116   He that has gold and great riches
William Dunbar, ‘Ane his awin ennemy’ — five 5-line stanzas with alternating refrains, ‘He wirkis sorow to him sell’ and ‘I gif him to the dewill of hell’
Number 1481-4
104.   f. 115v   Full oft I muse and has in thought
William Dunbar, ‘Best to be blyth’ — eight 5-line stanzas with refrain, ‘ffor to be blyth me think it best’
Number 5685-3
105.   ff. 116-116v   This ender night in Dumfermline
William Dunbar, ‘The Wooing of the King quhen he wes in Dumfermeling’ (The Tod and the Lamb) — ten seven-line stanzas
Number 693-1
106.   ff. 117-118v   As young Aurora with her crystal hale
William Dunbar, ‘The fenȝeit freir of Tungland’ — two 24-line stanzas sandwiching five 16-line stanzas, all in tail-rhyme
Number 1798-1
107.   ff. 118v-120   Harry harry hobillschowe
‘The manere of the crying of ane playe’ by William Dunbar — 173 lines in eleven 16-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 835-11
108.   f. 122   Better is to suffer and fortune abide
The Golden Mean — a couplet
Number 5112-3
109.   f. 122   Take time in time and no time defer
Four moralizing couplets
Number 418-1
110.   f. 122   Almighty god grant to our king
Brief prayer for good government — two couplets
Number 6554-5
111.   f. 122   Who of plenty will take no heed
A moralizing couplet, included in a longer series of proverbs against lending money
Number 2994-12
112.   f. 122   King counsel-less / Bishop loreless
The Abuses of the Age: rhyming lines ending in -les
Number 6330-5
113.   f. 122   When I lend I am a friend
Two couplets on the incommodities of lending
Number 5739-3
114.   ff. 132v-133   This night in my sleep I was aghast
William Dunbar, ‘The Devillis Inquest’ — thirteen or seventeen 5-line stanzas (aabab) with refrain, ‘Renunce ȝour god and cum to me’.
Number 3295-3
115.   ff. 133-134   Lucina shining in silence of the night
‘The birth of Antichrist’ (or a Dream of Fortune) by William Dunbar — ten 5-line stanzas
Number 3603-1
116.   ff. 135v-136   My good dame was one gay wife but she was right gend
‘Kynd Kittok’ by Dunbar — three 13-line stanzas
Number 3375.5-2
117.   ff. 136-136v   Man sen thy life is ay in weir
‘Advice to spend anis awin gude’ by William Dunbar — ten quatrains with refrain: ‘man spend thy gude quhill thow hes space’
Number 4495-4
118.   f. 137   Right early on Ash Wednesday
William Dunbar, ‘The twa cummeris’ — six 5-line stanzas with refrain
Number 2584-1
119.   f. 141   In summer when flowers sweet smell
An Advanture on Wednesday, a Middle Scots pastourelle — eleven 6-line stanzas (aaabab)
Number 1674-1
120.   f. 141v-142v   Guk guk good day sir gape while ye get it
Robert Henryson, ‘Sum practysis of Medecyne’ — ninety lines in seven stanzas
Number 4496-3
121.   ff. 144-144v   Right fain would I my acquaintance make
‘Sir Penny’ — seven 8-line stanzas
Number 4868-4
122.   ff. 147-154   Sir John the Rose one thing there is compiled
William Dunbar, ‘The Flyting of Dunbar and Kennedie’ — 552 lines in 8-line stanzas
Number 835-12
123.   f. 147   Better is to suffer and fortune abide
The Golden Mean — a couplet
Number 5112-4
124.   f. 147   Take time in time and no time defer
Four moralizing couplets
Number 418-2
125.   f. 147   Almighty god grant to our king
Brief prayer for good government — two couplets
Number 6554-6
126.   f. 147   Who of plenty will take no heed
A moralizing couplet, included in a longer series of proverbs against lending money
Number 2994-13
127.   f. 147   King counsel-less / Bishop loreless
The Abuses of the Age: rhyming lines ending in -les
Number 6330-6
128.   f. 147   When I lend I am a friend
Two couplets on the incommodities of lending
Number 2757-3
129.   f. 147   It that I give I have / It that I lend I crave
Moralizing lines on lending money — eight lines
Number 2224-3
130.   ff. 154-155v   I Master Andro Kennedy
William Dunbar, ‘The Testament of Mr Andro Kennedy’ — thirteen 8-line macaronic stanzas and a concluding 12-line stanza
Number 2105-2
131.   ff. 154-155v   I am as I am and so I will be
The rebellious lover, attributed to Sir Thomas Wyatt — 10 monorhyming quatrains
Number 782-1
132.   f. 212v   Be ye an lover think ye not ye should
William Dunbar, ‘Gude counsale’ — three 8-line stanzas
Number 4902-2
133.   ff. 214-215   Sith that I am a prisoner
William Dunbar, ‘Bewty and the Presoneir’ — fourteen 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc), last line of each ending with ‘…presoneir’
Number 6807-1
134.   ff. 215-215v   Would my good lady love me best
‘The Garmont of Gud Ladeis’
Number 6304-1
135.   f. 218   When Flora had overfret the firth
A balade — three 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc including refrain ‘Quhom I luf I dar nocht assay’
Number 5523-1
136.   ff. 218-218v   The well of virtue and flower of womanhood
A secular treatment of a hymn to the Heavenly Mistress — four stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3996-1
137.   ff. 220-220v   O mistress mine til you I me commend
A Balade to his Mistress — three 8-line stanzas, including refrain, ‘O maistres myn till ȝow I me commend’
Number 4182-1
138.   ff. 220v-221   Of love and truth with long continuance
Devotion to his mistress — seven stanzas rhyme royal
Number 2679-1
139.   f. 220v   Into my heart imprinted is so sore
On his mistress — three stanzas rhyme royal
Number 1269-2
140.   ff. 225-225v   Farewell now my lady gay
I take my leve agaynst my wyll’ — four 8-line stanzas, including refrain, ‘I take my leve agaynst my wyll’ with ‘farewell’
Number 1266-1
141.   f. 225   Farewell my heart farewell both friend and foe
A love letter with anaphoric lines — four stanzas rhyme royal
Number 2379-1
142.   ff. 230-230v   If no love is O God what feel I so
‘Song of Troilus’
Number 5249-9
143.   ff. 230-230v   The double sorrow of Troilus to tellen
Extracts from Geoffrey Chaucer, Troilus and Criseyde — rhyme royal stanzas
Number 2430-1
144.   f. 230   If ye would love and loved be
‘Advyce to luvaris’, attributed to William Dunbar — six quatrains with refrain: ‘Be secreit trew and pacient’
Number 3975-1
145.   f. 238v   O lust flower of youth benign and bright
William Dunbar, To the Queen Dowager — five 8-line stanzas with refrain: ‘Devoyd langour and leif in lustiness’
Number 4005.2-1
146.   f. 249v   When Phoebus fair with beams bright
A song of impossibilities with lying refrains: ‘Than will my reuerend lady on me rew’ — six stanzas rhyme royal
Number 1246-1
147.   f. 255   Fain would I love but where about
‘Counsale in Luve’, attributed to William Dunbar — seven 5-line stanzas with refrain
Number 5869-1
148.   f. 258v   Though all the wood under the heaven that grows
The wickedness of women: a companion piece to 2346 — one eight-line stanza
Number 2346-2
149.   f. 258v   If all the earth were parchment scribable
An extract (lines 239-45) of The Remedy of Love (4801), here adapted to the praise of women
Number 5785-1
150.   ff. 258v-259v   This work who so shall see or read
‘Fle þe mys-woman’, with an exemplum — twelve stanzas rhyme royal
Number 5614-3
151.   ff. 261-261v   These ladies fair that makes repair
William Dunbar, ‘Of the ladyis solistaris at court’ — six twelve-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 5201-3
152.   f. 262   The beastly lust the furious appetite
William Dunbar, ‘Ballate aganis Evill Women’, attributed to William Dunbar — six stanzas rhyme royal
Number 1123-2
153.   ff. 262v-263   Devise prowess and eke humilitee
Virtuous maidens but wicked wives — seven stanzas rhyme royal
Number 4092-1
154.   f. 263   O wicked women wilful and variable
Abuse of women — three stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3285-2
155.   f. 265   Love that is poor it is with pine
What Love is — four couplets (with ‘Love’ anaphora)
Number 468-2
156.   ff. 268-268v   An aged man twice forty years
Walter Kennedy, ‘Ane Aigit Manis Invective against Mouþ þankless’ — seven 8-line stanzas, ababbcbc, including refr. phrase, ‘…mowth thankless’
Number 1092-10
157.   ff. 269-274v   Cupido unto whose commandment
Lespistre de Cupide
Number 397-1
158.   ff. 275-276v   All tho that list of women evil to speak
A praise of women — twenty-five stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3789-2
159.   f. 278v   Now of women this I say for me
William Dunbar, ‘In prais of wemen’ — 34 lines in couplets
Number 6245-1
160.   ff. 281-283   What meaneth this What is this wonder hour
Against the inconstancy of women, an extract from The Complaint of the Black Knight (2541), lines 302-434, 456-469 — twenty-one stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3076-3
161.   f. 281   Lief love my love no longer it like
Walter Kennedy, ‘Pious Counsale’ — two 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 6587-1
162.   f. 281   Who will behold of love the chance
William Dunbar, ‘Inconstancy of Luve’ — three 8-line stanzas (aaabaaab) with the same rhymes throughout
Number 2536-2
163.   ff. 283-284v   In May as that Aurora did upspring
William Dunbar, ‘The Merle and the Nichtingaill’ — fifteen eight-line stanzas with alternating refrains, ‘A lusty lyfe in luves seruice bene’ and ‘All luve is lost bot vpone god allone'’
Number 3724-1
164.   ff. 284v-285v   Now cooled is Dame Venus brand
William Dunbar, ‘Of luve erdly and divine’ — fifteen quatrains, plus 2-line burden (bb), ‘Now cumis aige quhair ȝewth hes bene / And trew luve rysis fro the Splene’
Number 297-1
165.   f. 296   Alas so sober is the might
A warning to woman against false men by ‘Mersar’ — four 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) including refrain, ‘Sic perrel lyis in paramouris’
Number 2609-1
166.   ff. 302-310v   In the midst of May at morn as I ment
The Buke of the Howlat — seventy-seven 13-line stanzas (ababababcdddc)
Number 5424-1
167.   ff. 317v-325   The nobleness and great magnificence
Robert Henryson, Orpheus and Eurydice — 52 rhyme royal stanzas; five 10-line stanzas (aabaabbcbc); 218 lines in couplets
Number 5687-1
168.   ff. 325-326   This ender year I heard be told
Robert Henryson, ‘Bludy Serk’ — fifteen eight-line tail-rhyme stanzas
Number 5871-2
169.   ff. 326v-342v; ff. 299-302; ff. 310v-317v   Though feigned fables of old poetry
Robert Henryson, Fables — a prologue and thirteen fables, mostly in rhyme royal
Number 6374-1
170.   ff. 342v-345   When March was with the varying winds passed
William Dunbar, The Thrissil and the Rois — twenty-seven stanzas rhyme royal
Number 4493-2
171.   ff. 345-348v   Right as the star of day began to shine
William Dunbar, The Golden Targe — thirty-one 9-line stanzas
Number 726-2
172.   ff. 348v-354v   At Tweeds mouth there stands a noble town
‘The Freiris of Berwick’, sometimes ascribed to William Dunbar — 589 lines in couplets (with introductory couplet: ‘As it befell and happinit into deid &c.’)
Number 4510-1
173.   ff. 365-366v   Robin sat on good green hill
Robert Henryson, ‘Robene and Makyne’ — sixteen 8-line stanzas