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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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Found Records:
London, British Library Royal 18 B.XXIII
Linguistic note: McIntosh, Samuels, and Benskin (1986) and Benskin, Laing, Karaiskos, and Williamson (2013) (part of) LP 6751; Grid 483 177 (Berks).
Number 3199-1
1.   f. 44v   Lord God maker of all thing
A simple prayer to Christ — one quatrain
Number 5349-9
2.   f. 48v   The joy of our heart is ago
A single quatrain occurring in a sermon, Redde racionem villicacionis tue, preached by Wimbledon, translating Deficit gaudium cordis nostri…from Lamentations 5 — four monorhyming lines
Number 2549-1
3.   f. 64v1   In my grace thou hope not
Reply of Righteousness to Adam — one couplet in a prose sermon
Number 5939-1
4.   f. 64v2   Thy guilt is great and that is ruth
‘Rekewerynge is none and þat is trowthe:’ the councillor’s reply to a friend in need — one couplet
Number 5773-1
5.   f. 69v   This unrighteous man said in his saw
Debate between devils and angels over the body of a repentant robber — thirty-seven couplets in a short prose narrative, probably from Jacques de Vitry
Number 1416-1
6.   f. 81v1   For when the hound gnaweth the bone
One proverbial couplet in a sermon
Number 6751-4
7.   f. 81v2   With this beetle be he smitten
An English quatrain in a Latin story of the foolish father who gave away his goods, sometimes found in Bromyard’s sermons
Number 1089-1
8.   ff. 105v; ff. 107   Cry to Christ and not blin
A couplet in a prose sermon
Number 2132-1
9.   f. 107   I am walked in a way
Daily reminder of death — one couplet
Number 2126-1
10.   f. 107v   I am now in prison
The prisoner’s lament — four short lines
Number 6745-1
11.   f. 108   With sorrow thou came into this world
‘Þis world is but a vanitee’ — twelve lines
Number 1376-1
12.   f. 111v   For my sin that I have wrought
The Confession of the Prodigal Son — eight lines
Number 890-1
13.   f. 127v   Break out and not blin
A couplet translating ‘Erumpe et clama’ in an English sermon