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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Found Records:
London, British Library Harley 7333
Linguistic note: McIntosh, Samuels, and Benskin (1986) and Benskin, Laing, Karaiskos, and Williamson (2013) LP 9510; Grid 463 161 (Hants: 94-97); LP 5590; Grid 459 148 (Hants: ff. 150-156, 197-203); LP 5600; Grid 464 151 (Hants: ff. ff. 157-164, 165-196
Number 6321-13
1.   f. 25ra   When I advertise in my remembrance / And see how fell
‘Parvus Cato’ (Burgh)
Number 1418-22
2.   ff. 25ra-30va   For why that God is inwardly the wit / Of man
‘Cato Major’
Number 1432-3
3.   ff. 30va-31ra   Fortune alas alas what have I guilt
‘Complaint of a Prisoner against Fortune’ — twenty or twenty-one stanzas rhyme royal
Number 6066-1
4.   ff. 31rb-32vb   Trouble hearts to set in quiet
John Lydgate, ‘On the English title of Henry VI to the Crown of France’, translated from the French of Laurence Calot — 329 lines in couplets
Number 4458-1
5.   f. 32vb   Rejoice ye realms of England and France
[? John Lydgate]. Roundel on the Coronation of Henry VI — ten lines (ababababba)
Number 1464-3
6.   ff. 33ra-35vb   From Christs birth complete nine hundred year
John Lydgate, Guy of Warwick — 592 lines in 8-line stanzas
Number 6539-1
7.   ff. 36ra-36vb   Whilst I had youth I wist nought what it was
Richard Sellyng, An old man’s counsel to beware — seven stanzas rhyme royal of moral introduction, followed by ‘An Vocation til Oure Lady’ of fourteen stanzas rhyme royal, and a conclusion of six couplets wherein Squire Sellyng requests John Shirley ‘to amende where it is amisse’
Number 6414-32
8.   ff. 37-118   When that April with his showers soot
Canterbury Tales
Number 6415-28
9.   ff. 37ra-41vb   When that April with his showers soot
Geoffrey Chaucer, the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales — 858 lines in rhyming couplets
Number 6530-30
10.   ff. 41vb-53va   Whilom as old stories tellen us
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Knight’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 2249 lines in couplets
Number 6427-29
11.   ff. 53va-54ra   When that the Knight had thus his tale I-told
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Knight-Miller link in the Canterbury Tales — 78 lines in rhyming couplets
Number 6537-29
12.   ff. 54ra-57rb   Whilom there was dwelling in Oxenford
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Miller’s Tale in the Canterbury Tales — 666 lines in rhyming couplets
Number 6307-26
13.   ff. 57rb-57va   When folk had laughen at this nice cas
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Reeve’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 66 lines in couplets.
Number 724-28
14.   ff. 57vb-59va   At Trumpington not far fro Cantebridge
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Reeve’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 404 lines in couplets.
Number 5238-24
15.   f. 59va-59vb   The Cook of London while the Reve spake
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Cook’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 40 lines in couplets.
Number 145-24
16.   f. 59vb-60ra   A prentice whilom dwelt in our city
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Cook’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 58 lines in couplets.
Number 4315-29
17.   ff. 60ra-60va   Our Host saw well that the bright sun
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Introduction to the Man of Law’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 98 lines in couplets.
Number 3929-26
18.   f. 60va   O hateful harm condition of poverty
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Man of Law’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 35 lines (five stanzas) in rhyme royal.
Number 2587-32
19.   ff. 60vb-65va   In Syria whilom dwelt a company
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Man of Law’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 1026 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 4316-17
20.   f. 65va   Our Host upon his stirrups stood anon
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Epilogue’ of the Man of Law’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 28 lines in couplets.
Number 725-27
21.   ff. 65va-68vb   At Sarai in the land of Tartary
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Squire’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 664 lines in couplets.
Number 6185-12
22.   f. 68vb   Weeping and wailing care and other sorrow
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Merchant’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 32 lines in couplets.
Number 6535-26
23.   ff. 68vb-72vb   Whilom there was dwelling in Lombardy
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Merchant’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 1174 lines in couplets.
Number 6536-28
24.   ff. 73ra-74rb   Whilom there was dwelling in my country
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Friar’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 364 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 5756-24
25.   f. 74rb   This Summoner in his stirrups high stood
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Sommoner’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 44 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 3255-29
26.   f. 75va-77ra   Lordings there is in Yorkshire as I guess
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Summoner’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 586 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 4860-28
27.   f. 77ra-77rb   Sir Clerk of Oxenford our Host said
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Clerk’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales —56 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 5573-30
28.   f. 77rb-82va   There is at the west side of Italy
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Clerk’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales —1155 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 5801-13
29.   f. 82va-82vb   This worthy Clerk when ended was his tale
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Clerk’s Endlink’/‘The Host’s Stanza’ of the Canterbury Tales —one 7-line rhyme royal stanza.
Number 5617-21
30.   f. 82vb   These old gentle Bretons in their days
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Franklin’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 20 lines in couplets.
Number 2476-27
31.   ff. 82vb-86va   In Armorica that called is Brittany
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Franklin’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 896 lines in couplets.
Number 5405-28
32.   ff. 86vb-87ra   The minister and nourice unto vices
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prologue of the Second Nun’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 119 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 5729.4-28
33.   ff. 87ra-89ra   This maiden bright Cecilia as her life sayeth
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Second Nun’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 434 lines in rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 6296-24
34.   ff. 89ra-89vb   When ended was the life of Saint Cecilia
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Canon’s Yeoman’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 166 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 6753-24
35.   ff. 89vb-93ra   With this chanon I dwelt have seven year
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 762 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 5599-28
36.   ff. 93ra-94rb   There was as telleth Titus Livius
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Physician’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 286 lines in couplets.
Number 4314-23
37.   ff. 94rb-94va   Our Host gan to swear as he were wood
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Host’s Words’/‘Physician-Pardoner Link’ of the Canterbury Tales — 42 lines in couplets.
Number 3251-27
38.   ff. 94va-95rb   Lordings quod he in churches when I preach
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Pardoner’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 136 lines in couplets.
Number 2502-28
39.   ff. 95vb-97rb   In Flanders whilom was a company
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Pardoner’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 506 lines in couplets.
Number 3970-28
40.   ff. 97rb-97va   O Lord Our Lord Thy name how marvelous
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prioress’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 35 lines in 7-line, rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 5601-30
41.   ff. 97va-98rb   There was in Asia in a great city
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prioress’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 203 lines in 7-line, rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 6401-24
42.   ff. 98rb-98va   When said was all this miracle every man
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Prologue to Sir Thopas in the Canterbury Tales — 21 lines in 7-line, rhyme royal stanzas.
Number 3097-27
43.   ff. 98rb-99rb   Listen lords in good entent
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Sir Thopas in the Canterbury Tales — 207 lines in 6-line, tail-rhyme stanzas.
Number 3700-23
44.   ff. 99rb-99va   No more of this for Gods dignity
Geoffrey Chaucer, the ‘Thopas-Melibee Link’ in the Canterbury Tales — 48 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 6295-24
45.   ff. 108ra-108va   When ended was my tale of Melibee
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Monk’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 102 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 2316-26
46.   ff. 108va-112ra   I will bewail in manner of tragedy
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Monk’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 776 lines in eight-line stanzas.
Number 2033-22
47.   f. 112ra-112rb   Ho quod the Knight good sir no more of this
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Nun’s Priest’s Prologue of The Canterbury Tales — 53 lines in couplets, occurring in two forms, one lacking lines VII.2771-90.
Number 142-26
48.   ff. 112rb-114va   A poor widow somedeal stoop in age
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Nun’s Priest’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 626 lines in couplets.
Number 6711-23
49.   ff. 114va-115ra   Wit ye not where there stands a little town
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Manciple’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 104 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 6390-26
50.   ff. 115ra-116ra   When Phoebus dwelled here in this earth adown
Geoffrey Chaucer, the Manciple’s Tale of the Canterbury Tales — 258 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 941-24
51.   f. 116ra-116rb   By that the Manciple had his tale all ended
Geoffrey Chaucer, the the Parson’s Prologue of the Canterbury Tales — 74 lines in rhyming couplets.
Number 4229-7
52.   ff. 120ra-121vb; ff. 122ra-129vb   Of them that written us tofore
Confessio Amantis
Number 3693-1
53.   ff. 121vb-122ra   Next the dark night the gray morrow
Proverbs by Impingham — thirteen couplets
Number 5373-13
54.   ff. 129vv-132vb   The life so short the craft so long to learn
Geoffrey Chaucer, Parlement of Foules — 98 stanzas rhyme royal
Number 1518-7
55.   ff. 132vb-133va   Gladeth ye fowls of the morwe gray
‘Compleynt of Mars’
Number 3442-2
56.   f. 132vb1   Master Geoffrey Chaucer that now lieth in grave
Balade in praise of Chaucer — one stanza rhyme royal
Number 5823-8
57.   ff. 134ra-135rb   Thou fierce god of arms Mars the red
Geoffrey Chaucer, Anelida and Arcite — 357 lines in 45 stanzas of various forms, mostly rhyme royal
Number 627-3
58.   ff. 135rb-135vb   As I stood in studying alone
‘The complaynte ageyne Hope’ — fifteen 8-line stanzas
Number 2312-3
59.   f. 136ra-136rb   I which that am sorrowfullest man
An Amorous Complaint (Compleint Damours), sometimes attributed to Chaucer — thirteen stanzas rhyme royal
Number 5422-10
60.   ff. 136rb-146vb   The noble story to put in remembrance
Life of St. Edmund and St. Fremund (Lydgate)
Number 3388-5
61.   f. 147ra-147va   Man to reform thine exile and thy loss
‘Complaint þat Crist maketh of his Passioun’
Number 4990-9
62.   f. 147va-147vb   Some time this world was so steadfast and stable
Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘Lak of Stedfastnesse’ — four stanzas rhyme royal, including one-stanza Envoy
Number 5277-7
63.   f. 147vb1   The first stock father of gentilesse
Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘Gentilesse’ — three stanzas rhyme royal
Number 1326-17
64.   f. 147vb2   Flee from the press and dwell with sothfastness
‘Truth’
Number 6044-11
65.   f. 148ra1   To you my purse and to none other wight
Chaucer’s ‘Complaynt to his Empty Purse’ — three stanzas rhyme royal and 5-line Envoy
Number 5534-4
66.   f. 148ra2   The world so wide the air so remevable
A single stanza rhyme royal, occurring separately and in combinations
Number 5411-5
67.   f. 148ra3   The more I go the farther I am behind
The first stanza (ababbcc) of ‘Tyed with a Line’ (5410), standing alone or directly following 5534.
Number 5731-24
68.   ff. 149ra-149va   This mighty William Duke of Normandy
Verses on the Kings of England (Lydgate)
Number 4364-1
69.   ff. 149vv-150rb   Peter Peter prince of apostles all
Benedict [?Burgh], ‘A Christemasse game made by Maister Benet’ — twelve stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3596-3
70.   f. 180vb   My fellow for his sooth saw / hath lost his life and lieth full low
Rhyming comment of the second cock in the Story of the Three Cocks in the Gesta Romanorum — one couplet
Number 5902-1
71.   f. 200va   Three things been in fay
Three sorrowful things — three couplets, in one MS of the Gesta Romanorum
Number 3581-27
72.   ff. 204va-211vb   Musing upon the restless business
Hoccleve’s De Regimine Principum — 780 stanzas rhyme royal.