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The Digital Index of Middle English Verse
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Found Records:
London, British Library Harley 682
Number 536-1
1.   f. 74*v   And so be now that I my purpose lose
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 39) — 14 lines
Number 5298-1
2.   ff. 1-1v   The god Cupid and Venus the goddess
Charles d’Orléans, Cupid’s Letters-patent to the author, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 13) — an opening three-line stanza and thirteen monorhyming quatrains
Number 6344-1
3.   ff. 2-4   When in mine hand was taken me this patent
Charles d’Orléans, a discussion on Love — twenty-one stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3546-1
4.   ff. 4v-8   Most goodly fair above all tho living
An address to his mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 34) — a series of seven short balades (ababacac, abab), in all 208 lines
Number 6323-1
5.   ff. 8-8v   When I am laid to sleep as for a stound
Charles d’Orléans, a balade with refrain ‘This is my slepe y falle into decay’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 22) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 1450-1
6.   f. 8v   Fresh beauty rich of youth and lustiness
‘Alle thewis goode hath my lady dere’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 24) — five 9-line stanzas and one 6-line concluding stanza
Number 3305-1
7.   ff. 9v-10   Madame a trouth not wot I what to say
An absent lover, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 59) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 5689-1
8.   ff. 10-10v   This far from you am I lady mistress
Charles d’Orléans, The pangs of true love, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 60) — three l0-line stanzas (ababbccdcd) and four-line Envoy
Number 4901-1
9.   ff. 11-11v   Sith that I absent am thus from you fare
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Slake my gret aduersite’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 61) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbbbb) and 5-line Envoy
Number 310-1
10.   f. 11v   All be it so I seld have of you sight
Death a way out for the lover,. translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 62) — three 9-line stanzas and 6-line Envoy
Number 3818-1
11.   ff. 12-12v   Now what tiding my lady and mistress
Charles d’Orléans, To his Mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 63) — three 9-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3662-1
12.   f. 12v-13   My will my love my very source of bliss
Service of his mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 64) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3318-1
13.   ff. 13-13v   Madame ye ought well know to my seeming
‘The small plesere that y haue to me kaught’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 65) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 5-line Envoy (aabab)
Number 5724-1
14.   ff. 13v-14   This joyous time this fresh season of May
Charles d’Orléans, ‘The most woofull caytyf of fraunce’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 66) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbcdcd) and four-line Envoy
Number 1130-1
15.   ff. 14v-15   Displeasure thought wrath woe ne heaviness
The hopes of the lover, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 67) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line envoy
Number 3549-1
16.   f. 15   Most goodly young O pleasant debonaire
A letter praising his mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 68) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 6329-1
17.   ff. 15v-16   When I last parted from my hearts sweet
Charles d’Orléans, Thoughts on his mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 69) — three l0-line stanzas (ababbccdcd) and 4-line Envoy
Number 2054-1
18.   f. 16   Honour and praise as must to him abound
The Faithfull Lover, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 70) — three 10-line stanzas (ababbccbcb) and 4-line Envoy
Number 311-1
19.   f. 17   All be that of my fare or silly case
The Miseries of True Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 71) — three 8-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 4042-1
20.   f. 17v   O royal Hope too long I see thee sleep
Charles d’Orléans, Address to Hope, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 72) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 5-line Envoy (aabab)
Number 2530-1
21.   ff. 18-18v   In lovers paradise as them among
Sorrowful Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 73) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 4058-1
22.   f. 18v   O steadfast truth display thy banner
Charles d’Orléans, The Lover soured by misfortunes — three 8-line stanzas (ababbaab) and 5-line Envoy (aabba)
Number 897-1
23.   ff. 19-19v   Burning desire to see my fair mistress
The Fire of Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 76) — three 9-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3502-1
24.   ff. 19v-20v   Mine heart hath sent about ye far and near
‘The prison of grevous displesaunce’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 74) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbcaac) and 6-line Envoy (aabccb)
Number 1923-1
25.   ff. 20v-21   Heave ho mine heart the ship of fresh tiding
To his Mistress ‘hool tresoure of my worldly gladnes’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 77) — three 11-line stanzas (ababbccdede) and 6-line Envoy (aabcbc)
Number 3727-1
26.   ff. 21-21v   Now dread I danger nor yet none of his
Charles d’Orléans, The ‘God of loue woll helpe me in my nede’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 78) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3883-1
27.   f. 21v   O fair I wot ye have in remembrance
Charles d’Orléans, ‘The bond of love’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 79) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbccdd) and Envoy (aabb)
Number 3861-1
28.   ff. 22-22v   O come to me some gladsome tiding new
Charles d’Orléans, an Epistle to his Mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 80) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 2358-1
29.   ff. 22-22v   If I could make my wanton wishes flee
An Epistle to his ‘souereyn lady and maystres’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 92) — three 9-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3547-1
30.   f. 23   Most goodly fair as list it you to hear
His Mistress the Keeper of his Heart, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 15) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 3504-1
31.   f. 23v   Mine heart if so that I good tiding hear
A dialogue between a lover and his heart, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 83) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbcdcd) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 2081-1
32.   ff. 24-24v   How how mine heart open the gate of thought
‘A feithfull kynde maystres’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 82) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 6765-1
33.   ff. 24v-25   Within the treasure have I of my thought
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Love’s Mirror’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 85) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 258-1
34.   f. 25   Alack I can you neither love nor may
Longing for his Mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 85) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 909-1
35.   ff. 25v-26   But late ago went I my heart to see
His complaisant mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 89) — three 9-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 4067-1
36.   ff. 26-26v   O sweet thought I never in no wise
Charles d’Orléans, Delight in his Mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 90) — three 11-line stanzas (ababbccdeed) and 6-line Envoy (aabccb)
Number 3900-1
37.   ff. 27v-28   O Fortune dost thou my death conspire
Complaint on Fortune, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 93) — three 10-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 2070-1
38.   ff. 28-28v   Hope hath me now fresh gladsome tiding brought
The Lover’s Hopes, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 94) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 3712-1
39.   ff. 28v-29v   Not wot I now what wise to bear my cheer
Charles d’Orléans, a Balade to his Lady, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 95) — three 11-line stanzas and 6-line Envoy
Number 3648-1
40.   ff. 29v-30   My poor heart becomen is hermit
Unrequited love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 96) — three 11-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 28-1
41.   f. 30   A Danger here I-cast to thee my glove
‘Love’s Tournament’
Number 513-1
42.   ff. 31-31v   And God before the grief and great ennoy
His Shining Mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 99) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 721-1
43.   f. 31v   At the short game of tables for to play
The Game of Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 100) — three 8-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 6187-1
44.   ff. 32-33   Welcome and yet more welcome by this light
Charles d’Orléans, On News of his Mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 101) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 6056-1
45.   ff. 33-33v   Too long for shame and all too long truly
Charles d’Orléans, ‘This ioly tyme this fresshe first day of may’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 102) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 5-line Envoy
Number 642-1
46.   f. 33v   As in writing I put have my wishes
Beware of traitors in love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 103) — three 8-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 934-1
47.   f. 34   By god of love commanded lo am I
The strong castle of the Heart, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 104) — three 8-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 5418-1
48.   ff. 34v-35   The next time my lady and mistress
Charles d’Orléans, On the attractions of his Mistress, an Epistle, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 105) — three 10-line stanzas (ababbccdcd) and 5-line Envoy
Number 6244-1
49.   f. 35   What meanest thou hope dost thou me scoff and scorne
Charles d’Orléans, ‘For who that absent is is woobigon’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 106) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbcdcd) and 6-line Envoy
Number 5676-1
50.   ff. 36-36v   This Dyane day the first in the month of May
Charles d’Orléans, thoughts on pleasures of past May months, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 107) — three eight-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 5-line Envoy
Number 1370-1
51.   ff. 36v-37v   For love of God as keepeth remembrance
‘My lady and maystres’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 108) — five 10-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 262-1
52.   f. 37v   Alas alas how [?who] is it hath given entrance
Despair in Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 110) — three 9-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 4484-1
53.   ff. 38-38v   Right as I heard this other day tofore
News of his Mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 111) — three l0-line stanzas (ababbccdcd) and 4-line Envoy
Number 269-1
54.   ff. 38v-39   Alas death who made thee so hardy
The Sorrows of Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 117) — three 9-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 2578-1
55.   f. 39   In sleep been laid all song dance or disport
On the death of his lady, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 1343-2
56.   f. 40v   For deathlike life my living death I wit
On the death of his mistress, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-1ine stanzas and 4-line envoy
Number 6051-1
57.   ff. 41-41v   Toforn love have I played at the chess
Charles d’Orléans, On the Loss of his Mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 118) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbcddc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 448-2
58.   f. 41   Alone am I and will to be alone
On the death of his mistress — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy (including ‘Alone’ anaphora and refrain, ‘Alone y lyue an ofcast creature’)
Number 4832-1
59.   f. 41v   Should I me make a lady new fie fie
The Heart-broken Lover (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 4246-1
60.   ff. 42-42v   Oft in my thought full busily have I sought
Thoughts on his dead mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 119) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc and 5-line Envoy (aabab)
Number 6332-1
61.   ff. 42v-43   When I revolve in my remembrance
Charles d’Orléans, Thoughts on his dead mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 120) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 5348-1
62.   ff. 43-44   The jolly time the first fresh day of May
Charles d’Orléans, Thoughts on the First of May, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 121) — three 11-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 5459-1
63.   ff. 44-44v   The second day of fair fresh lusty May
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Thoughts on the Second Day of May’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 122) — three 10-line stanzas (ababbccdcd) and 4-line Envoy
Number 2191-1
64.   ff. 44v-45   I have the obit of my lady dear
A description of his mistress, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 127) — three 11-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 4882-1
65.   f. 45   Sith cursed death hath taken my mistress
Charles d’Orléans, Reflections on the death of his Mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), l29) — three 9-line stanzas and 6-line Envoy
Number 2308-1
66.   f. 46   I was long time one of the company
On the Company of Lovers, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 124) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 2604-1
67.   ff. 46v-47   In the forest of noyous heaviness
A meeting with Venus, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 123) — three 8-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 4379-1
68.   f. 47   Pleasant beauty had wounded sore my heart
The Wound of Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 125) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbcddc) and 4-line Envoy (abba)
Number 6310-1
69.   ff. 47v-48   When fresh Phoebus day of Saint Valentine
Charles d’Orléans, ‘On St. Valentine’s Day’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 126) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbccb) and 4-line Envoy
Number 2193-1
70.   ff. 48-48v   I hear many people plain
On Love and its Rewards, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 132) — three 9-line stanzas and 5-line Envoy
Number 4093-1
71.   ff. 48v-49   O woeful heart forecast with heaviness
Charles d’Orléans, The Tormented Lover — three stanzas rhyme royal and 4-line Envoy
Number 241-1
72.   ff. 49-52v   After the day that made is for travail
‘Of loue and his goode folkis alle’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 144) — twenty-two 8-line stanzas
Number 828-1
73.   f. 52v   Beseecheth this unto your regally
La Requeste’, an Epistle to Cupid and Venus, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 150) — eight 12-line stanzas and introductory couplet, ‘Vnto the excellent power and nobles / Of gode Cupide and Venus þe goddes’
Number 6424-1
74.   ff. 54v-58v   When that next approachen gan the fest
Charles d’Orléans, petition to the Court of Love, a series of balades translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 153) — twenty-eight 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) with a two-line address after stanza 21 and six concluding lines
Number 4201-1
75.   ff. 58-59   Of passed time the plaster of no care
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Love’s Maledy’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 163) — three stanzas rhyme royal and four line Envoy (aabb)
Number 750-1
76.   ff. 59-60   Ballads songs and complaints
Disinterest in the words of Love, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 162) — three 11-line stanzas and 6-line Envoy, each ending in the same line
Number 902
77.   ff. 60-60v   But for because that dainty lo is lief
The Food of Love, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 5730-1
78.   ff. 61-61v   This may that love not lusten for to sleep
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 25) — 14 lines
Number 3754-1
79.   f. 61v   Now hold himself from love let see that may
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 26) — sixteen lines
Number 6254-1
80.   f. 62   What so be that I say pardee
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 26) — 14 lines
Number 2694-1
81.   f. 62v   Is she not full of all goodly manner
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 27) — 14 lines
Number 4904-2
82.   f. 63   Sith that I have a nonpareil master
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 27) — fourteen lines
Number 3916-1
83.   f. 63v   O God how that she loketh very fair
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 28) — 14 lines
Number 933-1
84.   f. 64   By god but one my very pleasant joy
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 29) — 14 lines
Number 3793-1
85.   f. 64v   Now say me lo mine heart what is thy rede
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 29) — 14 lines
Number 665-2
86.   f. 65   As one sweet look of your eyen twain
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 21 lines, mostly in 5-line stanzas, with refrain, ‘As oon swete / Which wickid / As wisshe hit’
Number 6597-2
87.   f. 65v   Whoso beholdeth well as with my eye
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — fourteen lines
Number 5733-1
88.   f. 66   This month of May withouten peer princess
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 31) — 14 lines
Number 1060-1
89.   f. 66v   Command me what ye will in every wise
A roundel, 14 lines, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (cf. Champollion-Figeac (1842), 31)
Number 2384-1
90.   f. 67   If so were that ye know my woe truly
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 33) — 14 lines
Number 3660-1
91.   f. 67v   My very joy and most perfect pleasure
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 33) — 14 lines
Number 3538-2
92.   f. 68   More than the death nis thing unto me lief
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 21 lines, translated from his French poem (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 34)
Number 3926-2
93.   f. 68v   O goodly fair which I most love and dread
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel translated from his French poem (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 35) — 14 lines
Number 3548-1
94.   f. 69   Most goodly fair if it were your pleasure
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 32) — 21 lines
Number 4450-1
95.   f. 69v   Refresh the castle of my poor heart
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 32) — 14 lines
Number 4894-1
96.   f. 70   Sith love hath cast me banish everydeal
Charles d’Orléans, A roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 37) — 14 lines
Number 578-1
97.   f. 70v   As for the gift ye have unto me give
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 38) — 14 lines
Number 3307-1
98.   f. 71v   Madame as long as it doth please you aye
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 35) — 14 lines
Number 848-1
99.   f. 72   Beware I rede you look here not upon
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 36) — 14 lines
Number 4887-1
100.   f. 72v   Sith I may not escape me far nor near
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 36) — 14 lines
Number 2724-1
101.   f. 73   It is done there is no more to say
A roundel, trnslated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 37) — 14 lines
Number 1677-1
102.   f. 73v   Had I as much of worldly goods
Worldly riches cannot compare to love: a roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 38) — 14 lines
Number 6735-1
103.   f. 74*   With my true heart content of joy and weal
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 113) — 14 lines.
Number 579-1
104.   f. 74   As for your prayers in fame that is upbore
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 39) — 14 lines
Number 2649-1
105.   f. 74v   In thought in wishes and in dreams soft
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 113) — 14 lines
Number 569-1
106.   f. 75   As by the purchase of mine eyen twain
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 40) — 14 lines
Number 6000-1
107.   f. 75v   To show that I have not forgotten you
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 114) — 14 lines
Number 1426-1
108.   f. 76   Forsick in woe and far from joyous heal
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 40) — 14 lines
Number 4501-1
109.   f. 76v   Right nigh my heart with[in] my bosom lo
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 41) — 14 lines
Number 1409-1
110.   f. 77   For to behold the beauty and manner
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 41) — 14 lines
Number 5105-1
111.   f. 77v   Take take this cross at once at once my heart
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 42) — 14 lines
Number 6671-1
112.   f. 78   Why love you so much how may this be
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 42) — 14 lines
Number 2239-1
113.   f. 78   I praise nothing these kisses Dutch
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 43) — 14 line
Number 3635-1
114.   f. 79   My love only my joy and my mistress
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 114) — 14 lines
Number 3704-1
115.   f. 79v   Nor that I dread displeasen you only
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 43) — 19 lines
Number 5310-1
116.   f. 80   The great disease of sickful] annoyance
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 115) — 14 lines
Number 2372-1
117.   f. 80v   If it please you your kisses for to sell
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 44) — 21 lines
Number 3633-1
118.   f. 81   My love and lady whom I most desire
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 115) — 14 lines
Number 3163-1
119.   f. 81v   Lodge me dear heart in your arms twain
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 45) — 14 lines
Number 5870-1
120.   f. 82   Though Danger have the speech bereft me here
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 45) — 19 lines
Number 1530-1
121.   f. 82v   Go forth thy way my faithful desirance
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 46) — 21 lines
Number 2250-1
122.   f. 83   I put myself unto your mercy lo
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 46) — 14 lines
Number 6814-1
123.   f. 83v   Ye are too much as in my debt madam
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 47) — 14 lines
Number 6882-1
124.   f. 84   Your mouth it sayeth me bas me bas sweet
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French
(Champollion-Figeac (1842)) — 14 lines
Number 3711-1
125.   f. 84v   Not oft I praise but blame as in substaunce
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 166) — 14 lines
Number 711-1
126.   f. 85   At need thy friends proven what they be
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 48) — 14 lines
Number 1328-1
127.   f. 85v   Fleeth the shot of sweet regard
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 49) — 14 lines
Number 3661-1
128.   f. 86   My weal my joy my love and my lady
A roundel, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 49) — 14 lines
Number 135-1
129.   f. 86v   A pack a pack madame my load alight
A roundel — 14 lines
Number 5396-1
130.   f. 87   The meed/meadow is fled the grace is gone
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines (abbaabababbaab)
Number 89-1
131.   f. 87v   A ladys heart for to want pity
A roundel (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — 21 lines
Number 3885-1
132.   f. 88   O fair madame Christ would ye knew my pain
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 21 lines
Number 3602-1
133.   f. 88v   My ghostly father I me confess
The ‘confession‘ of a stolen kiss, a roundel by Charles d’Orléans — fourteen lines (two rhymes)
Number 3313-1
134.   f. 89   Madame I would by God alone
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 3917-1
135.   f. 89v   O God so as it enjoyeth me
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 1263-1
136.   f. 90   Farewell farewell my lady and mistress
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines, with ‘Farewel’ anaphora
Number 3887-1
137.   f. 90v   O fair madame no more unto me write
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 5760-1
138.   f. 91   This time when lovers aldermost defy
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 3536-1
139.   f. 91v   More speech Madame is of your goodliness
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 322-1
140.   f. 92   All desolate from joy or hearts heal
A roundel (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — 14 lines
Number 1576-1
141.   f. 92v   God of Thy grace the good soul now pardon
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 6504-1
142.   f. 93   Wherefore wherefore make ye three nays why
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 6378-1
143.   f. 93v   When me bethought is of my lady dear
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 185-1
144.   f. 94   A well mine heart but will ye not been wise
A roundel (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — 14 lines
Number 5468-1
145.   f. 94v   The smiling mouth and laughing eyen gray
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 3896-1
146.   f 95   O fie love fie amend your governaunce
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 97-1
147.   f. 95v   A lo mine heart what told I thee
A roundel — 14 lines
Number 5846-1
148.   f. 96   Thou shalt no more rule me my heart
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 769-1
149.   f. 96v   Be nice mine heart as purse is of an ei
To his foolish heart, a roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 3884-1
150.   f. 97   O fair madame all though that there be none
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 444-1
151.   f. 97v   Alms your mercy me my sweet
Number 6207-1
152.   f. 98   Well wanton ay but must ye needs play
Charles d’Orléans, a roundel — 14 lines
Number 581-1
153.   f. 98v   As he that no thing may profit
A roundel — 14 lines
Number 3508-1
154.   f. 99   Mine heart thou fondest by this light
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 4981-1
155.   f. 99v   Sometime is was a poor servitor
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 4121-1
156.   f. 102v   Oblesse oblesse que porar obler
A roundel by Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 1364-1
157.   f. 103   For Ipocras nor yet Galen
A roundel of Charles d’Orléans — 14 lines
Number 6220-1
158.   f. 103v-105   Were I a clerk then would I say you grace
Charles d’Orléans, Petitions to Cupid — ten stanzas rhyme royal
Number 3819-1
159.   ff. 105-107   Now will ye lords wash or shall I wash
Charles d’Orléans, Lovers’ Desires — fourteen stanzas rhyme royal
Number 5068-1
160.   f. 107   Sweet heart / Mercy
Sweet love, I die, by Charles d’Orléans — three stanzas of six short lines each
Number 6429-1
161.   f. 107v   When that ye go
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Leave me not, Mistress’ — three 16-line stanzas (aaabaaabbbbabbba)
Number 5926-1
162.   f. 109   Thus in a piece of tire I most delite
Charles d’Orléans, on his chosen mistress — two 5-line (aabba) and two 3-line (aaa) stanzas
Number 276-1
163.   f. 109v   Alas Fortune alas mine heaviness
Complaint against Fortune, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 249) — 22 lines
Number 732-1
164.   f. 110   Avaunce thee Hope as mine affiance
Comfort from Hope, a carole translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 250) — 22 lines in quatrains, two with additional line refrain
Number 2083-1
165.   f. 110v   How is it how have ye forgotten me
Lady, have pity on me, a carole translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 251) — 25 lines in stanzas of varying lengths
Number 3731-1
166.   ff. 111-124v   Now fell me when this Jubilee thus was made
Charles d’Orléans, a love sequence, consisting of chanson d’aventure adventures of the poet in the realm of Love — 94 stanzas rhyme royal with inserted ‘bill of complaynt’ of seven 8-line stanzas
Number 4163-1
167.   ff. 124v-125   Of fair most fair very source and well
Have pity on me, mistress, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 3537-1
168.   f. 125   More than body heart good and service
The Service of his Mistress by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 4505-1
169.   ff. 125v-126   Right youngly fair replete with goodlihood
Have pity, mistress, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 246-1
170.   f. 126v   After winter the vere with foils green
Mistrust me not, Mistress — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy (associated with Charles d’Orléans)
Number 3924-1
171.   ff. 127-127v   O good sweet heart my joy and sole pleasaunce
Charles d’Orléans, Show pity, mistress — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 1073-1
172.   ff. 127v-128   Constraint of pain thought and heaviness
His hard-hearted mistress by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line envoy
Number 280-1
173.   f. 128   Alas how ever could the God of Kind
A letter to his mistress for favours (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 5435-1
174.   ff. 128v-129   The pleasant leams of your eyen clear
Charles d’Orléans, A criticism of his mistress — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 5729.1-1
175.   ff. 129-129v   This long delay this hope without comfort
Charles d’Orléans, An Epistle to his Mistress — three eight-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and four-line Envoy
Number 3925-1
176.   ff. 129v-130   O goodly fair sith I have done and shall
Charles d’Orléans, ‘O good swet hert have me not in disdayne’ — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 4294-1
177.   ff. 130-130v   Oppressed with thought langour and heaviness
Lyric poem asking mistress to state her intentions, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 4893-1
178.   ff. 130v-131   Sith it is so we needs must depart
Exchange of faithful lovers’ hearts, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 3515-1
179.   f. 131   Mine only joy my lady and mistress
An epistle to his lady, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 56) — twelve 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc)
Number 4046-1
180.   f. 133   O seely anchor that in thy cell
Charles d’Orléans, In the presence of his mistress — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab), including ‘Wo worth’ anaphora
Number 6199-1
181.   f. 133v   Welcome my joy welcome mine hearts ease
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Welcome no more but now me sle or slave’ — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy, including ‘Welcome’ anaphora
Number 6723-1
182.   ff. 134-134v   With excess shake forsaked and forfaint
Charles d’Orléans, ‘My ioy is turnyd to hevynes’ — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 5589-1
183.   ff. 134v-135   There nis in me comfort or gladnesss
Charles d’Orléans, False Report — three eight-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and four-line Envoy
Number 3886-1
184.   ff. 135-135v   O fair madame if so ye dare not lo
Charles d’Orléans, Verses asking mistress to love him ‘in spite of daunger and his affynyte’ — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 2337-1
185.   ff. 135v-136   I yield myself to you save me my life
The trials of Love, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3930-1
186.   ff. 136v-137   O heart more hard than rock of any stone
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Trouthe may not rewarde me in my right’ — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) with this refrain and 4-line Envoy
Number 6880-1
187.   f. 137   Your goodlihood mine hearts lady dear
Charles d’Orléans, On his mistress — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 2336-1
188.   ff. 137v-138   I wretch fulfilled of thought and heaviness
Think on me, lady (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3647-1
189.   ff. 138-138v   My pained ghost enforceth me complain
‘Thus pitously my deth ye do contryve’ — three 8-line stanzas with this refrain and 4-line Envoy (associated with Charles d’Orléans)
Number 3667-1
190.   f. 138v-139   My woeful heart that sleeps lo in care
True love ‘without departyng all my lyvis space’, translated from the French of Charles d’Orléans (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 130) — three 11-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 1763-1
191.   ff. 139-139v   Half in despair not half but clean dispaired
The lover gets disgusted with Love’s tribulations by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 6730-1
192.   ff. 139v-140v   With heart repentant of my great offence
Charles d’Orléans, an epistle to his mistress — six stanzas rhyme royal
Number 1678-1
193.   f. 140v   Had I hearts a thousand thousand score
In the company of his mistress by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3889-1
194.   ff. 141-141v   O fairest flower O flower of flowers all
Charles d’Orléans, a criticism of his mistress — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 2055-1
195.   ff. 141v-142   Honour joy health and pleasance
A place in his mistress’ heart, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 3957-1
196.   ff. 142-142v   O lo mine heart since ye will gone your way
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Ye wote my wele what shulde y wordis more’ — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 6729-1
197.   ff. 142v-143v   With heart body and whole puissance
Charles d’Orléans, ‘His kindly mistress’, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 436) — three 9-line stanzas (ababbcdcd) and 4-line Envoy
Number 4903-1
198.   ff. 143v-144   Sith that I am your have been and shall
Charles d’Orléans, Devotion to his Mistress, translated from the French (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 183) — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy
Number 288-1
199.   f. 144   Alas madame what manner strife
The Eyes belie the Mouth (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — three 7-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 3047-1
200.   ff. 144v-145   Lend me your pretty mouth madame
A Dialogue between a lover and his mistress by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy
Number 4399-1
201.   ff. 145-145v   Presence of you it causeth my comfort
‘I am yowr owen’, by Charles d’Orléans — three 7-line stanzas (ababbcc) and 4-line Envoy (aabb)
Number 3895-1
202.   ff. 145v-146   O fie Fortune fie thy deceit and scorn
Charles d’Orléans, ‘Nor yet y trust heraftir shalt thou not’ — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) with this refrain and 4-line Envoy (Champollion-Figeac (1842), 164)
Number 4471-1
203.   ff. 146-146v   Return for shame return return again
On unfaithfulness, by Charles d’Orléans — three 8-line stanzas (ababbcbc) and 4-line Envoy (abab)
Number 4933-1
204.   ff. 146v-147   So fresh beauty so much goodliness
An Epistle to his Mistress (associated with Charles d’Orléans) — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy, including ‘So’ anaphora
Number 577-1
205.   f. 147   As for farewell farewell farewell farewell
Parting is grievous — three 8-line stanzas and 4-line Envoy